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2019-2020 Departmental Results Report

By Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

ISSN number : 2561-0015

Catalog number : Iu90-1/16E-PDF

Publish date : December 7, 2020

Summary :

This report deals with Canada Economic Development's principal achievements in regards to its engagements towards the Parliament.

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Table of Contents

  1. Minister's message
  2. Institutional Head's message
  3. Results at a glance and operating context
  4. Results: what we achieved
  5. Analysis of trends in spending and human resources
  6. Additional information
  7. Appendix: definitions
  8. Endnotes
  9. Supplementary information tables

Minister's message

It is our pleasure to present the 2019-20 Departmental Results Report for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED). As the Department continues to mobilize industry and the research community to confront the COVID-19 pandemic, the various organizations in the ISED Portfolio have coordinated their efforts to position Canada as a global innovation leader and shape an inclusive economy for all Canadians.

Together with the other regional development agencies, CED continued to implement the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program in 2019-2020, a strategic component of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan. This program supports business growth and innovation to help regions diversify and build stronger, more innovative communities across Canada.

By participating in the promotion of sustainable and inclusive economic growth, an entrepreneurial environment conducive to innovation, and the economic assets of Quebec's regions, CED has made a significant contribution to the achievement of the portfolio's objectives. Its targeted and strategic interventions continue to give Quebec's small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) the means to position themselves in the economy of tomorrow.

These are just a few examples of CED’s work on behalf of Canadians regardless of their background, region or generation. We invite you to read this report to learn more about how we are. We invite you to read this report to learn more about CED's ongoing efforts to support the growth and expansion of Quebec SMEs and help them become more productive, competitive, and innovative.

Melanie Joly

Mélanie Joly
Minister of Economic Development and
Official Languages

Institutional Head's message

I am pleased to present the 2019-20 Departmental Results Report of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED). This annual report outlines our achievements and provides an assessment of the progress made in achieving the objectives set out in our Departmental Plan.

CED is a federal organization that is close to Quebec businesses and communities. Our work highlights the importance of the regions and the diversity of their needs and economic realities.

In 2019-2020, for the second year in a row, we continued to implement the priorities of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan, namely support for regional innovation ecosystems; business growth and expansion; clean technologies; and inclusive growth. By investing in the pursuit of long-term objectives, CED ensures that it works in continuity with its mandate, while offering the regions of Quebec programs and initiatives that meet their needs.

The end of the 2019-2020 fiscal year was marked by the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic and by the social and economic repercussions of the physical distancing measures decreed by governments. We quickly adapted our operations and mobilized resources to deploy new measures to support businesses suffering the effects of the pandemic. This economic recovery effort continues to this day.

Once again, this year, CED's sustained efforts with Quebec businesses and communities have generated tangible results, which I invite you to discover by reading through this report. You will be able to measure how far we have come in one year to build the economy of tomorrow and to make a concrete contribution to Canada's long-term economic growth and prosperity.

I hope you enjoy reading it.

Manon Brassard

Manon Brassard
Deputy Minister / President of Canada Economic
Development Canada for Quebec Regions

Results at a glance and operating context

Funds used
(Actual spending in 2019-20)
Staff
(Full-time equivalents [FTEs] in 2019-20)
324,622,726 334

CED invested 100% of its grants and contributions (G&C) budget, that is $278.8M, to support the implementation of 1,128 projects in all regions of Quebec. This financial aid had a significant leverage effect: on average, each dollar invested by CED generated an additional investment of $3.84 from other sources.

In 2019, Quebec’s economy posted strong growth; in fact, GDP growth was greater than that reported in Canada as a whole. Of particular note was the remarkable increase in employment, with an unemployment rate of 5.1% and accelerated wage growth; the growth in exports due to the strong performance of the U.S. and global economies; the rise, albeit more moderate, in investment; and finally, the strength of the housing market. Thus, before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic at the end of the 2019–2020 fiscal year, the Quebec economy was in full swing.

However, some challenges were apparent. In addition to the uncertainty surrounding global trade, the Quebec economy continued to face internal challenges: recruitment issues in certain sectors and regions; slow productivity growth; an entrepreneurial deficit; delays in the adoption of innovative processes and digital technologies; and limited sources of growth for remote communities. Indeed, many communities that are far from major urban centers have undiversified economies and depend on opportunities arising from a single sector, such as natural resource development or tourism. As a result, these communities remain more sensitive to economic fluctuations.

Within this context, CED continued to work with its network of federal, provincial and regional collaborators in 2019–2020 to provide the regions of Quebec with programs and initiatives that meet their needs and help them enhance their economic assets, diversify, and develop their full growth potential.

Besides implementing its programs and various government initiatives, CED also focused on five priorities. The following paragraphs provide an overview of the results achieved for each of these priorities.

1. Strengthen regional ecosystems that support innovative businesses

Young innovative businesses (start-ups) are key players in Quebec’s innovation ecosystem. As a partner, facilitator and convener that relies on innovation as a lever for economic development, CED plays a central role in supporting these start-ups. This support took various forms in 2019–2020: the CED Fast Forward Challenge, the continued implementation of the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) national program, and the launch of the Incubators and Accelerators Driven by Excellence (IADE) Initiative, are just a few examples.

Launched in May 2019, the IADE will strengthen our synergy with the business incubators and accelerators in Quebec that provide crucial support for start-ups at all stages of their existence and act as nurseries for talent and innovation. In 2019-2020, five incubators and accelerators had their projects approved and will benefit from a total of $12 million in funding over four years.

CED also supported 54 organizations with a view to strengthening regional innovation ecosystems through the REGI program; these included industrial clusters and organizations that assist with the development of small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs). One example is the Quartier de l'innovation de Montréal, which supports co-operation and experimentation between the entrepreneurial and academic communities and the citizens of Montreal.

2. Support the growth and expansion of businesses, particularly those with high potential

CED provided $155 million in direct financial support to 705 SMEs to support their growth. Every dollar invested by CED will generate an additional investment of $6.84. Furthermore, 62 organizations also benefited from a total of $30 million in CED funding. This financial assistance will help SMEs increase their productivity, commercialize new products, expand, and diversify their markets.

3. Support clean economic growth

CED’s target was to invest a minimum of $25 million in clean technology in 2019–2020. In fact, CED far exceeded this goal, investing nearly $42 million in 161 projects aimed at improving environmental performance, using less energy-intensive technologies or developing technologies to reduce companies’ environmental footprint.

4. Contribute to inclusive growth by supporting women entrepreneurs and Indigenous peoples

CED works with all groups and communities in Quebec and took concrete steps in 2019–2020 to strengthen the implementation of its inclusive vision of economic development. The following are a few examples:

5. Pursue the Horizon 2021 initiative

CED continued to implement its Horizon 2021 Initiative, in which it committed to being innovative in the way it does business, delivers its services and meets the public’s expectations. In this regard, a sustained effort was made in 2019–2020 to carry out various projects, such as the CORTEX grants and contributions system, the CED Fast Forward Challenge, the Innovation Incubator Initiative and CED’s digital strategy.

For more information on CED’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility

Developing Quebec’s economy

Description

Support Quebec economic growth, job creation and economic prosperity through inclusive clean growth; help SMEs growth through trade and innovation; and build on competitive regional strengths.

Results

CED and the other five regional development agencies (RDAs) work together to contribute—within the confines of their respective mandates—to the economic development of all regions of Canada.

To measure progress with respect to the achievement of its core responsibility, CED seeks to contribute to, and influence, the three departmental results below.

The previously mentioned priorities all support, to varying degrees and in a complementary manner, the achievement of these three departmental results.

Departmental Result 1: Businesses are innovative and growing in Quebec

CED pursued the implementation of the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) national program in Quebec. Delivered by the various RDAs, this program targets the economic growth of businesses and the regions through innovation. RDAs represent one of the government’s four flagship platforms to support innovation, and they coordinate their efforts with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), the Trade Commissioner Service of Canada (TCS), and Innovation Canada.

In 2019–2020, an additional $15 million was made available to the regions of Quebec to support regional innovation ecosystems and help SMEs grow, export to new markets and adopt new technologies and processes. Through its regular funds and the additional $15 million received, CED approved 165 new projects that have an innovative component, thus far exceeding the established target of 100 projects. Again through the REGI program, CED and the other RDAs implemented the Steel and Aluminum Initiative; this funding is part of a broader effort to strengthen the productivity and competitiveness of SMEs operating in this sector. CED invested the entire budget of $26.2 million in 38 businesses involved in the Canadian steel and aluminum supply chain, to allow them to make strategic investments and boost their productivity and competitiveness.

CED also continued to support for partnership projects between contractors and businesses, thus contributing to their economic growth. As part of the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB)policy, CED organized tours and industrial days to promote the capacities of Quebec businesses and research centers. In addition, CED participated in more than twenty networking events, including trade shows and trade missions, always with a view to maximizing the industrial and technological spinoffs generated by the Government of Canada's major acquisition projects in the land sector, as well as in the aerospace, marine and security sectors.

Through its funding for the Centre québécois de développement durable, CED has helped regional SMEs improve their productivity and build their capacity to meet the requirements of prime contractors in Quebec by adopting sustainable development–related concepts in their operations. Some 50 or so SMEs will receive support to conduct a diagnosis and develop a sustainable development strategy. Among other things, the projects support a study on the sustainable development expectations and requirements of the international markets targeted by regional SMEs, and the development of strategies to facilitate the transfer of expertise to businesses.

Example of a Project Funded by CED

Entreprise Lefebvre Industri-AL is a family-owned Baie-Comeau company specializing in the recovery, treatment and reclamation of various alloy residues.

The repayable contribution of $1.7 million will allow the business to diversify its operations by introducing an innovative and non-polluting aluminum scum recovery technology developed by the company itself. This new process will completely eliminate the need to landfill residues and will enable the recovery of all the by products of aluminum recycling and significantly limit the creation of greenhouse gases.

Departmental Result 2: Communities are economically diversified in Quebec

Economic diversification

CED signed new five-year agreements with 67 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs) in Quebec. This co-operation under the Community Futures Program (CFP) will make their services accessible to a larger number of businesses and in new areas. Furthermore, these new agreements were enhanced to better meet the needs of rural communities, notably through the addition of new funds and significant changes as concerns the delivery of their services. Specifically, the changes aim to better match needs with financial resources allocated according to socio-economic indicators, thus providing even more support for the most vulnerable communities. A recent evaluation shows that the CFP continues to contribute to the achievement of results associated with business funding and support services, including the strengthening of business practices, stability and economic growth; job creation; and the diversification of rural economies.

CED also funded a number of ad hoc initiatives aimed at supporting rural and remote regions, including the Canadian Experiences Fund (CEF). The CEF has a budget of $11.5 million over two years (2019–2021) to support Quebec communities. In this first year of the fund, CED approved 38 projects worth a total of almost $10.9 million, which, in turn, will generate an investment of over $41.9 million by various stakeholders. The investments made include projects that promote local experiences (for example, fishing or gastronomic tours), community beautification projects, and projects to enhance tourism facilities in rural and remote areas. The CEF also aims to boost Indigenous tourism and promote inclusion—particularly for the LGBTQ2 community—by providing support for train-the-trainer programs, festivals, special events and pre-marketing activities.

CED also made structural investments in support of projects aimed at sustaining the tourism industry. In particular, it earmarked $10 million to support the acquisition of cross-country ski and snowmobile trail maintenance equipment. With the help of CED funding, 73 organizations in 51 RCMs will be able to improve the client experience for tourists and athletes. CED also supported projects involving the construction, modernization or expansion of tourism infrastructure to enhance a region’s touristic drawing power. Authorized assistance of close to $19 million was granted to organizations responsible for various tourist sites, including the Sanctuaire Notre-Dame-du-Cap in the Mauricie region, Parc Safari, and Destination Sept-Îles. Together, these projects will generate an investment of over $77 million by various stakeholders.

Finally, CED continued its support for communities affected by particular challenges. This includes the Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, which was launched in June 2013 and ended on March 31, 2020. CED invested a total of $50 million in 65 projects to support the economic transition of communities affected by the foreseeable end of the chrysotile asbestos industry. In 2019–2020, $8 million was invested in 13 projects, mainly in the Des Appalaches and Des Sources RCMs. In addition, CED continued to support the economic recovery in Lac-Mégantic following the train accident that occurred on July 6, 2013. Over $1.7 million was invested in six projects in 2019–2020.

Under-represented groups

CED has put several measures in place aimed at increasing the participation of under-represented groups—including women, Indigenous peoples and youth—in the economy in general and in entrepreneurship in particular.

For example, in January 2019, it launched the CED Fast Forward Challenge, an experimental project specifically targeting young engineering students or graduates. A total of 10 innovative businesses from across Quebec each received a $50,000 grant to carry out their business projects.

CED also supported 27 new economic projects by Indigenous entrepreneurs or organizations in 2019–2020. With a total of 47 projects receiving funding, CED has already far exceeded its objective of supporting 40 new projects by 2021.

Finally, CED approved 24 projects in 2019–2020 under the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES), bringing the total number of projects to 70 since the start of implementation in 2018-2019. Part of the Innovation and Skills Plan (ICP), this government-wide strategy represents an investment of almost $5 million across Canada aimed at helping women grow their businesses by providing them with access to financing, talent, networks and expertise.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus

As part of its regular programs, CED collects statistics on the gender and diversity of the principal SME owners (i.e., whether they belong to one of the following groups: youth, Anglophones, Indigenous peoples, women, persons with disabilities and visible minorities). This information is collected on a voluntary basis to inform internal or external policies, programs and services.

It allows CED to better understand the impact of these programs and initiatives for evaluation and continuous improvement purposes and helps in the identification of potential gaps in accessibility and the communication needs of various target groups in the regions of Quebec.

Experimentation

CED Fast Forward Challenge

DEC launched the CED Fast Forward Challenge in January 2019. This pilot project aimed to support innovative entrepreneurship among young people by offering ten start-up businesses in cutting-edge sectors the opportunity to obtain a grant of $ 50,000 each. Some 72 innovative companies took part in the competition and ten of them will be able to turn their business projects into reality through grants totalling half a million dollars.

The experimental design of this competition allowed CED to test new business practices, target new clientele and apply the GBA + analytical approach to assess the potential impact on diverse groups of people. The entrepreneurial activities of the participants as well as the performance of the businesses that will be launched will be monitored in order to document the impact.

The first evaluation report concluded that the pilot project had made it possible to experiment with the use of generic terms and conditions through a competition; that collaboration between internal and external players upstream was a good practice; and that GBA+ considerations had been solidly incorporated during the design phase. Lessons learned from this evaluation included the need to document the thinking behind project selection, and the possibility of creating a pool of ideas during the reflection process with a view to using them in future projects. Also, the use of a project charter to convey a common understanding upstream is particularly useful in the case of experimentation.

Departmental Result 3: Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Quebec

Investment in innovation is essential to allow SMEs to remain competitive and grow. During the 2019–2020 fiscal year, CED continued to support businesses that develop and adopt innovations and commercialize them. Through the REGI program, CED supported 224 commercialization projects worth a total of $20.8 million, which in turn generated an investment of $258.2 million by various stakeholders.

Moreover, as mentioned under Priority 1, the launch of the IADE laid the groundwork for the strengthening of the vitality of our innovation ecosystem by mobilizing incubators, accelerators and other players on the ground around shared projects. This will foster growth and innovation in start-ups by ensuring that they are supported by exceptional organizations that are well-connected and able to create success stories that extend beyond our borders.

Example of a Project Funded by CED

Located in Saint-Jérôme, the Institut du véhicule innovant (IVI) is a college centre for technology transfer (CCTT) affiliated with the Cégep de Saint-Jérôme that supports manufacturers of electric and intelligent vehicles throughout Quebec. Its projects focus on the electrification of transportation, improving the energy efficiency of vehicles, reducing GHGs and polluting emissions, and developing renewable energy sources in the transportation sector.

CED has authorized a non-repayable contribution of $749,600 to increase the organization's innovation and technology transfer capacities in order to accelerate the adoption of green technologies by manufacturers in the electric and intelligent vehicle sector and thus reduce the ecological footprint of transportation.

Results achieved

CED’s core accountability is assessed annually by means of three departmental outcomes and nine socio-economic indicators, which are used to track progress. These are high-level economic indicators and the objectives pursued are long-term and stem from the Government of Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan. The achievement of these objectives depends on a number of factors; CED’s intervention contributes to their achievement, within the limits of the organization’s budgets. As shown below, most of the established targets have been met.

Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2018–19 Actual results 2019–20
Actual results
R1: Businesses are innovative and growing in Quebec Number of high-growth businesses in Quebec (by revenue) 3.400*** March 31, 2020 NA 2,620* NA*
Value of Quebec goods’ exports (in dollars) $86.0 B March 31, 2020 78,6 G$* 86.1 G$* 86.6 G$
Value of Quebec clean tech exports (in dollars) Not available March 31, 2020 NA NA 3.0 G$**
Revenue growth rate of businesses supported by CED programs 10.0% March 31, 2020 12.3%**** 4.7%**** NA*
R2: Quebec communities are economically diversified Percentage of Quebec SMEs that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous peoples, youth, visible minorities or persons with disabilities

Women 16.5%

Indigenous peoples 0.5%

Youth 17%

Visible minorities 5%

Persons with disabilities Not available**

March 31, 2020

Women: NA

Indigenous peoples: NA

Youth: NA

Visible minorities: NA

Persons with disabilities: NA

Women: 16.2%

Indigenous peoples: 0.7%

Youth: 17.2%

Visible minorities: 4,5%

Persons with disabilities: 0.2%

Women: NA

Indigenous peoples: NA

Youth: NA

Visible minorities: NA

Persons with disabilities: NA

Percentage of professional positions in science and technology in Quebec’s economy 36.5 % March 31, 2020 36.1%* 35.4%* 36.6%*
Amount leveraged per dollar invested in community projects $2.20 March 31, 2020 2.48 $ 2.76 $ 2.24 $
R3: Businesses invest in the development and commercializa-tion of innovative technologies in Quebec Value of R&D spending by businesses receiving CED program funding (in dollars) $25M March 31, 2020 30 M$ 36 M$ 62 M$
Revenue growth rate of businesses supported by CED programs 19.% March 31, 2020  NA 22.9 %* NA*
  • * The latest data published by Statistics Canada dates to 2018-2019. Data are therefore not available for the current fiscal year.
  • ** Statistics Canada released the results of the clean technology indicator for the first time in this exercise. The result achieved will serve as a reference for our next targets.
  • *** Changes have been made to the methodology used by Statistics Canada to measure the number of high growth businesses. This result was established based on the new methodology and cannot be compared to that presented in the 2019-2020 Departmental Plan.
  • **** Previously, CED used internal data whereas, for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 results, the data comes from Statistics Canada.

Interpretation of the “Results achieved” table

  • R1: Driven by the economic strength of foreign markets and the relative weakness of the Canadian dollar, Quebec’s goods’ exports grew in 2019, surpassing the $86 billion target by more than $2.6 billion. And, for the first time this year, Statistics Canada produced the figure for the current value of Quebec’s clean technology exports: $3.0 billion. This figure could serve as a benchmark for CED in subsequent years.
  • R2: The second indicator predicts a high proportion of professional jobs in science and technology in the Quebec economy. This proportion rose slightly in 2019–2020 to 36.6%, just exceeding the target of 36.5%. The Quebec average also remains higher than the Canadian average (34.7%). CED was able to contribute to the achievement of this target by pursuing its efforts to support the adoption of digital technologies within companies by providing $106.4 million in funding for 253 new projects, generating a total investment of $619.0 million. As regards the third indicator, CED supported projects in 101 RCMs, and generated a substantial leverage effect through the projects it supported: for every dollar invested by CED in community projects, the other financial partners invested $2.24, slightly exceeding the established target of $2.20. This result demonstrates CED’s catalyst effect in the regions of Quebec.
  • R3: The SMEs supported by CED spent over $62.0 million on research and development (R&D), far exceeding the established target of $25 million. It should be noted that CED focuses on projects with a strong R&D component.
Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2019–20
Total authorities available for use
2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019–20
Difference
(Actual spending minus planned spending)
306,093,251 301,916,121 311,562,899 303,896,531 1,980,410

The table above presents the budgetary financial resources for CED's core responsibility.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
191 180 -11

The table above presents the human resources for CED's core responsibility.

Financial, human resources and performance information for CED’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 1.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communication Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Material Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services

Results

Modernization and optimization projects aimed at improving the agility of our processes and approaches were carried out in the business offices and at Head Office. Work continued on the Horizon 2021 Initiative throughout fiscal 2019–2020, with projects being implemented in the three areas of transformation shown below:

People and Culture
Text version:
People and Culture Policies and Procedures Tools and Technologies
A healthy, learning, innovative and diversified organization whose employees are networked, engaged and have the skills to contribute to the success of businesses and regions and a key partner in the achievements of the ISED portfolio Policies and parameters translating the government's priorities into timely initiatives and tangible services to contribute to the success of businesses and regions.

Procedures in all areas of activity are clear, staright-forward and required for effective decision-making, client service excellence and the achievement of desired results.
Up-to-date and user friendly and high performance technologies which optimize our procedures and enable everyone-CED employees, partners and clients-to be informed, work/interact effectively and make the best decisions more quickly.

Some of the projects and initiatives carried out in 2019–2020:

  • CED pursued its transition to CORTEX, a new grant and contribution (G&C) management system that makes up part of CED’s digital strategy and the modernization of its business processes. Good progress was made on this major project in 2019–2020. Achievements include the deployment of several modules and the configuration of the transactional portal, which will provide user-friendly, secure and real-time access to CED services.
  • CED rolled out an innovative communications strategy in conjunction with the CED Fast Forward Challenge and received the Regional Powerhouse of Communications Excellence award at the 2nd edition of the Government of Canada’s Communications Awards of Excellence ceremony. This recognition underscores CED’s exceptional contribution in support of regional communications activities that improve services to Canadians.
  • Six projects were carried out as part of the Innovation Incubator Initiative, which was launched in 2018 to seize opportunities or develop non-traditional solutions to everyday problems through experimentation. More than a dozen organizations have approached CED this year regarding the setting up of this team as a good practice in innovation.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2019–20
Total authorities available for use
2019–20
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019–20
Difference
(Actual spending minus planned spending)
19,151,289 20,230,571 20,181,706 20,726,195 495,624

The table above presents the budgetary financial resources for CED's internal services.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
151 154 3

The table above presents the human resources for CED's internal services.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Departmental spending trend graph
Figure 1 - Long Description

In 2017-2018, expenditures reached $311 million, mainly due to funding received for the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (Streams I and II). This two-year, $62.1M initiative ended on March 31, 2018, partly explaining the decrease in the voted appropriations in 2018-2019.

In 2019-2020, expenditures reached $324.6 million. This increase is explained in part by additional funding for two initiatives: $26.2M over one year for the Steel and Aluminum Initiative and $12.1M over two years for the Canadian Experiences Fund.

The funding gap between 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 is $23.7 million. This is due to several factors, mainly the termination of the Steel and Aluminium Initiative and the Economic Diversification Initiative for Chrysotile-Dependent Communities on March 31, 2020.

The marked decrease in expenditures from 2021-2022 is explained in particular by the fact that the expenditures planned as of April 1, 2021, do not include the reinvestment of revenues from repayable contributions from our clients, since authorizations weren’t obtained at the time of writing this report.

The marked decrease in spending from 2021-2022 can be explained by the fact that the planned spending as of April 1, 2021 does not include the reinvestment of income from repayable contributions from our clients, since the authorizations were not obtained. at the time of writing.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
2019–20
Total authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used)
Developing Quebec’s economy 306,093,251 301,916,121 280,818,767 219,711,873 311,562,899 303,896,531 273,397,927 291,790,589
Internal Services 19,151,289 20,230,571 20,137,691 18,971,844 20,181,706 20,726,195 19,738,917 19,638,153
Total 325,244,540 322,146,692 300,956,458 238,683,717 331,744,605 324,622,726 293,136,844 311,428,742

CED continually adapts to the changing economic context in order to meet regional needs and respond to various government priorities and initiatives. Thus, expenditures vary from year to year based on targeted or temporary support initiatives that are launched or completed.
Additional funding for new initiatives includes:

End of funding for completed initiatives includes:

  • 2017–2018: end of the CIP 150 on March 31, 2018
  • 2019–2020: end of the Steel and Aluminum Initiative and the Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile on March 31, 2020

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents
Developing Quebec’s economy 182 180 191 180 184 180
Internal Services 138 142 151 154 156 153
Total 320 322 342 334 340 333

Along with budget fluctuations from year to year, the number of FTEs also varies depending on the funding received for various temporary or targeted initiatives.

In 2019–2020, the decline in the actual number of FTEs in relation to the number forecast (-8 FTEs) can be partially attributed to delays in the hiring of workers to fill skilled positions that are in high demand in the labour market.

As concerns Internal Services, a few additional resources were required to carry out various organizational modernization and optimization projects, notably the digital strategy—including the development of the new grant and contribution management system (CORTEX) and the implementation of the financial and material management system (SAP)—and the creation of the Innovation Incubator.

Expenditures by vote

For information on CED’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2019–2020Footnote 2.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of CE’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 3.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

CED’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statement highlights

The financial highlights presented below provide an overview of CED’s financial position and operations. The unaudited financial statements are drawn up in accordance with government accounting policies, which are based on Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles for the public sector.

The expenditures set forth in the tables in other sections of the Report were prepared on a cash basis, whereas the financial highlights below were prepared on an accrual basis. Tables reconciling these two accounting methods are presented in the Notes to CED’s Financial Statements.

A more detailed statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations with the requested authorities, is available on CED’s website.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20
Planned results
2019–20
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus
2019–20 Planned results)
Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus
2018–19 Actual results)
Total expenses 205,722,000 213,040,007 173,919,390 7,318,007 39,120,617
Total revenues 0 0 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 205,722,000 213,040,007 173,919,390 7,318,007 39,120,617
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 2018–19 Difference
(2019–20 minus
2018–19)
Total net liabilities 18,135,403  17,003,094  1,132,309 
Total net financial assets 14,325,836  13,657,523  668,313 
Departmental net debt 3,809,567  3,345,571  463,996 
Total non-financial assets 2,797,191  2,453,642  343,549 
Departmental net financial position (1,012,376)  (891,929)  (120,447) 

Liabilities

  • As at March 31, 2020, CED’s net liabilities stood at $18.1 million, up 6.7% from 2018–2019. This increase is largely attributable to the increase in vacation pay and compensatory leave.
  • Accounts payable and accrued liabilities account for the largest share of liabilities: 79.0% ($14.3 million) of total net liabilities. Vacation pay and compensatory leave, along with future fringe benefits, account for, respectively, 14.5% ($2.6 million) and 6.5% ($1.2 million) of the organization’s net liabilities.

Assets

  • As at March 31, 2020, net financial assets stood at $14.3 million, up 4.9% from the previous year’s total. This increase is primarily attributable to the increase in accounts receivable and advances.
  • CED’s non-financial assets stood at $2.8 million as at March 31, 2020, a year-over-year increase of 14.0%. This rise is primarily the result of the increase in tangible capital assets.
  • Furthermore, CED’s loans, held entirely on behalf of the government, amounted to $424.5 million as at March 31, 2020, up 1.1% from 2018–2019.

Additional information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister:

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

Institutional head:

Manon Brassard

Ministerial portfolio:

Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Enabling instrument:

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act (S.C. 2005, c. 26)Footnote 4

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2005

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on CED’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter

Reporting framework

CED’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

Departmental results Framework

Core Responsibility: Economic Development in Quebec

Internal Services
Departmental Result: Businesses are innovative and growing in Quebec Indicator: Number of high growth firms in Quebec
Indicator: Value of exports of good (in dollars) from Quebec
Indicator: Value of exports of clean technologies (in dollars) from Quebec
Indicator: Revenue growth rate of firms supported by CED programs
Departmental Result: Communities are economically diversified in Quebec Indicator: Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous people, youth, visible minorities and persons with disabilities in Quebec
Indicator: Percentage of professional, science and technology-related jobs in Quebec’s economy
Indicator: Amount leverage per dollar invested by CED in community projects
Departmental Result: Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Quebec Indicator: Value of Business Expenditure in Research and Development (BERD) by firms receiving CED program funding (in dollars)
Indicator: Percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions in Quebec
Program Inventory Program: Regional Innovation
Program: Community economic development and diversification
Program: Targeted transition support

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for CED’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 5.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on CED’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax ExpendituresFootnote 6.

This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

800 René Lévesque Blvd. West, Suite 500
Montréal, Quebec
H3B 1X9

Telephone: 514-283-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302
www.dec.canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

  • appropriation (crédit)
  • Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
  • budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
  • Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
  • Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
  • An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
  • Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
  • A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
  • Departmental priority (priorité)
  • A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
  • Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
  • A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by programlevel outcomes.
  • Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
  • A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
  • Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
  • A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
  • Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
  • A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
  • experimentation (expérimentation)
  • The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decisionmaking, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
  • full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
  • A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full-time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.
  • gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)(analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
  • An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and genderdiverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
  • government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
  • For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
  • horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
  • An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
  • non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
  • Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
  • performance (rendement)
  • What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
  • performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
  • A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
  • performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
  • The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
  • plan (plan)
  • The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
  • planned spending (dépenses prévues)
  • For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.
  • A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
  • program (programme)
  • Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
  • program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
  • Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
  • result (résultat)
  • A consequence attributed, in part, consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
  • statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
  • Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
  • target (cible)
  • A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
  • voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
  • Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016 to 2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of this Act to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, CED supports reporting on the implementation of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.

2. Sustainable development in CED

CED’s Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the department’s actions in support of achieving:

Department's actions in support of achieving the following goals:

  • Goal 2: Low-carbon government
  • Goal 3: Clean growth
  • Goal 8: Sustainably managed lands and forests

This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental actions pertinent to these goals. Previous years’ supplementary information tables are posted on CED’s website.

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental action[s] in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

Context: Low-Carbon Government

The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

FSDS goal: Low-Carbon Government
FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s)

Results achieved

Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings/operations*

NA

NA

NA

NA

Modernize our fleet*

Reduce carbon intensity by purchasing or replacing vehicles (e.g., electric vehicles, hybrids, fuel-efficient vehicles). Promote the car-sharing initiative in the various sectors

Starting point:

GHG emissions from the vehicle fleet in fiscal 2005–2006:

  • Average corporate consumption in 2005 (L/100 km): 10
  • Total consumption (litres): 52,031
  • Kilometres travelled: 520,447
  • Estimated corporate CO2 emissions (kg): 116,642.

CED largely exceeded 3 of the 4 targets aimed at reducing GHG emissions produced by its fleet of vehicles

  • Average corporate consumption (L/100 km): 10,31 (target reached)
  • Total consumption (litres): 16 536 (target exceeded by 68%)
  • Kilometres travelled: 177 128 (target exceeded by 65%)
  • Estimated corporate CO2 (kg): 37 849 (target exceeded by 68%)

FSDS:

By ensuring the reduction of corporate carbon consumption and the modernization of its fleet of vehicles, CED has contributed to reducing GHG emissions. Indeed, the vehicle fleet is one of the main sources of GHGs at DEC.

United Nation’s Sustainable development goals

SDG 13: Climate change

Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement
  • Integrate environmental considerations into procurement management processes and controls.
  • Ensure that decision-makers have the necessary training and awareness to support green procurement.
  • Ensure that contributions to, and support for, the objectives of the Government of Canada Policy on Procurement objectives are included in the performance evaluations of key officials.
  • Maintain and improve the printing rate (15 FTEs for 1 printer) and the use of recycled paper.
  • Continue using Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) standing offers and supply arrangements to choose green, sustainable goods and services.
  • Pursue work initiatives for a paperless environment through electronic solution strategies and better information management.
  • Ensure that the performance agreements of purchasing and supply managers and supervisors in the Technology, Information, Security and Administration Branch include support and contributions towards green procurement during the fiscal year in question.
  • Pursue the target of 90% of toner cartridges recycled relative to the total volume of all toner cartridges purchased in the year in question.
  • The print rate has improved greatly: it increased to 30 FTE for 1 printer. The paper used for prints is 100% recycled.
  • Procurement takes into account environmental considerations in the process of purchasing goods and services.
  • Several information management projects contributing to the progress towards paperless have been implemented, such as:
    1. the installation of digitizers in the reflection rooms;
    2. creation of metadata for ministerial correspondence;
    3. creation of a workflow for translation services and creation of human resources files.
  • Although support and participation in green procurement was not included in the performance agreement of the manager responsible for supplies and purchasing, she was aware and informed of our sustainability goals. She also received training for this purpose (C215). A target to this effect has since been added to the performance agreement.
  • 100% of toner cartridges are recycled.

FSDS:

Through green purchases that integrate environmental considerations, CED has helped reduce the GHG emissions caused by its operations.

United Nation’s Sustainable development goals

SDG 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Target 12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Demonstrate innovative technologies*

NA

NA

NA

NA

Promote sustainable travel practices*
  • Implement more robust videoconferencing capacities, thus reducing the need to travel for in-person meetings.
  • Maintain existing approaches for sustainable workplace practices, such as using modern technologies to facilitate employee mobility.
  • Pursue the upgrading of videoconference systems and ensure their reliability.
  • Put in place work tools and technologies to facilitate telework.
  • In order to reduce travel, CED employees are now equipped with computers and cell phones allowing them to use video conferencing devices.
  • CED encourages flexible working methods among its staff, such as remote work, at the same time reducing travel and GHG emissions.

FSDS:

By implementing sustainable practices that reduce travel and encourage flexible working methods, CED helps to limit or decrease GHG emissions.

United Nation’s Sustainable development goals

SDG 13: Climate change 13,3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Understand climate change impacts and build resilience* NA NA NA NA
Improve transparency and accountability NA NA NA NA
Develop policy for low-carbon government NA NA NA NA
  • * This contributing action does not apply to small and micro departments.
  • This contributing action applies only to the Centre for Greening Government at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

Context: Clean growth

Through its various programs, CED invests in technologies that aim, among other things, to reduce GHG emissions and air pollutants.

FSDS Goal: Clean Growth
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investment in clean energy research, development and demonstration by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions.

Through the Quebec Economic Development Program, support clean technologies by fostering the development, production or adoption of technologies that improve environmental performance in a given market.

Starting point: N/A

Performance indicator:

  • Annual CED spending on projects that support clean technologies.

Target:

  • Regional development agencies aim to double their total annual support for clean technologies to $ 100 million per year, from existing resources. Of this amount, CED has committed to invest $ 25 million per year.

CED exceeded the set target with annual expenditures of $ 41.8 million for 160 clean technology projects.

SFDD :

Through its G&C programs, CED has contributed to federal government investments in clean technologies
United Nation’s Sustainable development goals
SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.

9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities.

Context: Sustainably managed lands and forests

  • Through its main program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), CED implemented the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec (SICSBOQ) to help prevent its spread and thus reduce the negative impact on the environment and economies of the regions.
  • The spruce budworm is wreaking havoc in Quebec's forests. By fighting it, the Government of Canada is helping to contain an outbreak that could destroy thousands of hectares of forest and harm the forest industry's economy, its workers, and the rural communities that depend on the forest industry.
FSDS goal: Sustainably managed lands and forests
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Terrestrial ecosystems: By 2020, at least 17% of land areas and inland waters are conserved via networks of protected areas and other effective zone-based conservation measures. Build capacity and provide support. Deliver the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec (SICSBOQ) to limit the negative effects of the outbreak and create economic development opportunities in various regions.

Starting point: 44,606 hectares treated from 2014-2015 to 2017-2018:

  • 12,121 hectares treated in year 1 (2014–2015);
  • 9,329 hectares treated in year 2 (2015–2016); et
  • 8,644 hectares treated in year 3 (2016–2017)
  • 14,512 hectares treated in year 4 (2017–2018).

Performance measurement:

  • Number of hectares of infested areas treated.

Target: CED aims to treat an area of 12,000 hectares of infested areas per year with organic pesticides (36,000 by 2020).

The Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak started in 2014-2015 and ended in 2017-2018. During this period, a total area of 44,606 hectares was treated, exceeding the target set.

SFDD: Through its Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak, CED has helped to preserve and restore the targeted terrestrial ecosystems. It supported the forest sector and the health of Canada's forests by preventing the spread of the Spruce Budworm Outbreak, thereby contributing to sustainable forest management.

United Nation’s Sustainable development goals

SDG 15: Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss. 15.8 By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to low carbon government.

Additional departmental activities and initiatives Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal
Maintain and promote sustainable practices in the relocation of Head Office and certain business offices.
  • Take a "greener" approach to work by optimizing the workplace and technological tools through the implementation of "Workplace 2.0".
  • Promote a paperless work environment through the implementation of "Workplace 2.0" and electronic document management.
  • When moving, dispose of surplus assets in accordance with sustainable development practices (e.g., through Eco-Collecte, a recycling organization, or other community organizations).
  • Promote sustainable practices for responsible consumption, such as the establishment of a system for exchanging office supplies among various sectors before buying new ones.
  • CED applied standard 2.0 in all of its real estate projects.
  • CED applied the 2.0 standard in 2019-2020 and continued its efforts to emphasize electronic document management and avoid paper management. To this end, discussions have been held with IT to change the print settings of its network printers.
  • In its only project to upgrade its spaces, CED applied the ecological arrangement of equipment and recycling through the sale and reuse of equipment removed and needing to be replaced. The project team recycled any equipment that could be reused in the deputy minister's office and government affairs branch relocation project. Also, in setting up the temporary space in this project, CED opted for an update of the current spaces at 259 St-Joseph instead of setting up completely new spaces for the Minister and the Deputy Minister, thus reducing the ecological footprint of the project.
  • During 2019-2020, CED set up a working group on sustainable actions, whose mandate was to contribute to the various elements of the DSDS. The accomplishments of this committee include:
    • Conferences aimed at more environmentally friendly meeting and Christmas party practices;
    • Change of cleaning products used in our offices for biodegradable products;
    • Discussions with the owner of the head office in order to improve the composting and recycling of materials and computer equipment;
    • Recycling batteries at the head office.

SFDD:

By implementing sustainable practices when moving its offices, CED has ensured the efficient use of resources and promoted responsible working methods.

United Nation’s Sustainable development goals

SDG 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Target 12.5:  By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse

4. Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2019–20 reporting cycle, CED had no proposals that required a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and no public statements were produced.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

Start date

April 1, 2012

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Grants and contributions

Type of appropriation

Annual allocation of funds through the expenses budget

Fiscal year for terms and conditions  

2017-2018

Link to the department's Program Inventory

The QEDP is linked to three programs of the Program Inventory:

  1. Regional Innovation;
  2. Vitality of Communities; and
  3. Targeted or Temporary Support.

Description

The QEDP supports the economic development and diversification of regions and helps them seize promising economic development opportunities for the future.

Results achieved

Through the QEDP, CED has contributed to promoting the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec.

In 2019-2020, CED invested $ 60.5 million to support 243 projects aimed at the economic development and diversification of Quebec regions.

The projects aimed to support SMEs to enable them to grow and expand; increase their productivity; to market new products; to diversify their markets; to adopt or develop cleaner technologies; or to improve their environmental performance. In line with CED's inclusive vision of economic development, other projects also aimed to support SMEs belonging mainly to members of one or other of the following five target groups: women, Aboriginals, youth, visible minorities or people with disabilities.

The 5 specific initiatives delivered through PDEQ obtained the following results:

  • Economic Development Initiative (EDI) - Official Languages: $ 1.9 million invested in 18 projects;
  • Infrastructure development initiative: $ 1.3 million invested in 3 projects;
  • Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities reliant on Chrysotile: $ 8.0 million invested in 13 projects;
  • Aid for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic: $ 1.7 million invested in 6 projects.
  • Canadian Experiences Fund: $ 3.3M in 30 projects.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

No audits were completed in 2019-2020.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

No evaluations were completed in 2019-2020. The following evaluation will be completed in 2021-2022.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

CED informs the public, SMEs and economic development stakeholders in the regions of Quebec about its QEDP on an ongoing basis by means of a wide range of activities and communication tools that target the profile and information needs of the various players involved.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 25,000 1 650 000 60,000 60,000 -1,590,000
Total contributions 238,142,111 187,852,938 56,518,950 66,428,331 60,428,211 3,909,261
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 238,142,111 187,877,938 58,168,950 66,488,331 60,488,211 2,319,261
Explanation of variances Actual spending for some targeted or temporary initiatives exceeded planned spending for 2019-2020, including Initiative for the Economic Recovery for Lac Mégantic and the Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities reliant on Chrysotile.

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Community Futures Program (CFP)

Start date

May 18, 1995

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Contributions

Type of appropriation

Annual allocation of funds through the expenses budget

Fiscal year for terms and conditions  

2010-2011

Link to the department's Program Inventory

The CFP falls under the Vitality of Communities Program

Description

This national program helps communities in all regions of the country take charge of their local economic growth. In Quebec, the CFP provides funding for local development agencies in the form of non-repayable contributions

Results achieved

Through the PDC, CED financially supported the following community development organizations in 2019-2020:

  • the 58 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs), located in designated rural areas;
  • the 8 Business Development Centers located in suburban areas.
  • the CFDC and BDC Network;
  • the Fonds commun des SADC du Québec;
CED granted $ 33.3 million to these organizations divided into 70 projects.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

No audits were completed in 2019-2020

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

A national and horizontally led evaluation by ISED was carried out in 2019-2020. The evaluation found that the program, through its contributions to economic development, mainly in rural areas, remained relevant and delivered results. The evaluation recommended harmonizing and improving performance measurement nationally and considering ways to incorporate GBA + considerations.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

CED continues to inform development agencies and community players about Government of Canada funding provided through the CFP.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 28,683,673 28,374,194 28,968,000 33,289,621 33,289,621 4,321,621
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 28,683,673 28,374,194 28,968,000 33,289,621 33,289,621 4,321,621
Explanation of variances The expenditure forecasts for the CFP program will be adjusted upwards as of the 2020-2021 fiscal year, since the financial assistance was increased when the contribution agreements were renewed on April 1, 2019.

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

Start date

April 1, 2012

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Grants and contributions

Type of appropriation

Annual allocation of funds through the expenses budget

Fiscal year for terms and conditions  

2017-2018

Link to the department's Program Inventory

The QEDP is linked to three programs of the Program Inventory: 1) Regional Innovation; 2) Vitality of Communities; and 3) Targeted or Temporary Support.

Description

The QEDP supports the economic development and diversification of regions and helps them seize promising economic development opportunities for the future.

Results achieved

Through the QEDP, CED has contributed to promoting the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec.

In 2019-2020, CED invested $ 60.5 million to support 243 projects aimed at the economic development and diversification of Quebec regions.

The projects aimed to support SMEs to enable them to grow and expand; increase their productivity; to market new products; to diversify their markets; to adopt or develop cleaner technologies; or to improve their environmental performance. In line with CED's inclusive vision of economic development, other projects also aimed to support SMEs belonging mainly to members of one or other of the following five target groups: women, Aboriginals, youth, visible minorities or eople with disabilities.

The 5 specific initiatives delivered through PDEQ obtained the following results:

  • Economic Development Initiative (EDI) - Official Languages: $ 1.9 million invested in 18 projects;
  • Infrastructure development initiative: $ 1.3 million invested in 3 projects;
  • Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities reliant on Chrysotile: $ 8.0 million invested in 13 projects;
  • Aid for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic: $ 1.7 million invested in 6 projects.
  • Canadian Experiences Fund: $ 3.3M in 30 projects.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

No audits were completed in 2019-2020.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

No evaluations were completed in 2019-2020. The following evaluation will be completed in 2021-2022.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

CED informs the public, SMEs and economic development stakeholders in the regions of Quebec about its QEDP on an ongoing basis by means of a wide range of activities and communication tools that target the profile and information needs of the various players involved.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 25,000 1,650,000 60,000 60,000 -1,590,000
Total contributions 238,142,111 187,852,938 56,518,950 66,428,331 60,428,211 3,909,261
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 238,142,111 187,877,938 58,168,950 66,488,331 60,488,211 2,319,261
Explanation of variances Actual spending for some targeted or temporary initiatives exceeded planned spending for 2019-2020, including Initiative for the Economic Recovery for Lac Mégantic and the Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities reliant on Chrysotile.

Gender-based analysis plus

Institutional GBA+ Capacity

GBA+ Governance framework

In accordance with its Statement of Intent on GBA+ adopted in 2018-2019, CED continues to incorporate other measures to adapt and align the design and delivery of its policies, programs, internal practices and client services with the Government of Canada's political commitments and guidelines in this regard.

The GBA+ Coordination Centre serves to facilitate, plan, monitor and report on GBA+ practices, including the implementation of the GBA+ 2018-2020 Readiness Framework. Through these measures, the Agency continues its GBA+ activities, including:

  • Continuing to support employees in completing the mandatory online GBA+ training so that the Agency achieves and maintains a 100% completion rate;
  • Ensuring the presence of two resource persons, who are the key subject matter experts on GBA+ and have overall responsibility for facilitating the implementation of the GBA+ 2018-2020 Framework;
  • Ongoing evaluation of CED's GBA+ pilot initiative, the Fast Forward Challenge;
  • Formal GBA+ roles and responsibilities for each of CED's business units, developed in consultation with each sector's management and published on the GBA+ intranet page;
  • Maintenance of a page dedicated to ACS+ on the intranet with all resources for employees, including roles and responsibilities by business unit.

During the year 2019-2020, changes to CED's multisectoral committee were initiated to support all issues associated with equity, diversity and inclusion at the Agency, both internally and externally, in order to raise awareness, inform and mobilize employees and managers on these issues, including the GBA+ approach. For example, the committee organized an activity for the first time during Black History Month in February inviting entrepreneurs and professionals from the Black community to discuss the issues and identify opportunities for collaboration and support from CED in the short and medium term.

Finally, CED began implementing the TBS strategic direction to modernize sex and gender information practices. For example, in 2019-2020, CED removed greetings from all correspondence with clients, such as the acknowledgement of receipt of an application for financial assistance. In addition, the Privacy Impact Assessment (personal information) was revised and submitted to TBS.

Data Collection

As part of its regular grants and contributions programs, CED proceeds with a voluntary questionnaire after project approval, in order to certify that the collection of information has no impact on CED's decision to grant financial assistance. The data allows CED to better understand the impacts of its programs and initiatives for the purposes of evaluation and continuous improvement. The information is collected for statistical and ACS+ purposes to inform our internal or external policies, programs and services. It allows for the identification of potential gaps that may exist in terms of accessibility and communication needs to various target groups in the regions of Quebec.

  • SME: CED asks the legal representative of the SME to voluntarily declare whether the principal owners of the SME are part of one of the following target groups: youth (under 40 years of age), Anglophones, Aboriginals, women, persons with disabilities and visible minorities.
  • NPO: CED collects information on the clientele targeted by the NPO: youth, Anglophones, Aboriginals, women, persons with disabilities and visible minorities. In a few cases, the NPO also collects some information on the gender and diversity of the SMEs that have received their services. This is the case with the Community Futures Program (CFP), where CED asks Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs) to collect some information on gender and diversity and to submit this information to CED annually. In addition, in the case of local development projects, CFDCs collect information on groups targeted by these projects if they are part of the previously mentioned target groups.

Highlights of GBA+ Results by Program

Regional Innovation

In total, 76 projects directly supporting target groups were approved in 2019-2020. Activities focused on supporting business scale-up and productivity as well as regional innovation ecosystems. These mainly contributed to 3.2 Increased opportunities for women to start and grow their businesses and succeed on a global scale objective of the Gender Results Framework.

CED Fast Forward Challenge: An entrepreneurial contest for engineering students and graduates launched in 2019, the CED Fast Forward Challenge is currently being evaluated. As highlighted in the 2018-2019 report, the Challenge was selected as a GBA+ pilot project to demonstrate GBA+ relevance, build awareness, and identify best practices within CED. In this regard, proposals were evaluated partly based on gender considerations, with bonus points awarded for applicants with 25% or more ownership by women. In 2018-2019, ten winning companies were selected to receive $50,000 each. Four of these companies had female shareholders, including at least two who held 50% or more of their company's shares.

Possible outcomes include: increasing the number of youth and women taking steps to start a business; increasing the number of women intending to start a business; and, increasing the percentage of SMEs whose majority owners are youth and women.

Vitality of Communities

Under this program, 27 projects directly benefitted target groups, focusing on local development support, development and promotion of assets and the region. These mainly contributed to 3.2 Increased opportunities for women to start and grow their businesses and succeed on a global scale objective of the Gender Results Framework.

Under the Community Futures Program (CFP), CED indirectly contributed to coaching and entrepreneurial succession for youth through its financial support to CFDCs and BDCs under the Youth Strategy. For example, as part of this initiative, 567 young entrepreneurs were financed with loans from the CFDCs and BDCs (34% of financed entrepreneurs were women), for a total amount of $8.9M.

Targeted or temporary support

Under this program, 38 projects directly benefitted target groups. These mainly contributed to 3.2 Increased opportunities for women to start and grow their businesses and succeed on a global scale objective of the Gender Results Framework.

The Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES), implemented by CED in Quebec, is aimed to double the number of majority women-owned SMEs in Canada by 2025. WES is aligned with objective 3.2 of the Gender Results Framework previously mentioned, and more specifically with Indicator 3.2.1, which measures the proportion of businesses that are majority owned by women, based on the size of the business.

In 2019-2020, CED invested in 24 projects that provided more than $23.5M in assistance to women entrepreneurs. This includes:

  • $1.69M invested in 17 Women's Entrepreneurship Fund (WEF) projects enabling these women-owned and -operated businesses to expand and grow
  • $17.3M invested in 7 WES Ecosystem Fund projects (including $3.1M in support of COVID-19 this year) to non-profit organizations to strengthen services to women entrepreneurs and address ecosystem gaps. In 2019-2020, Fund recipients served more than 1,850 clients in Quebec, including approximately 100 Aboriginal clients, 600 immigrants, 850 clients from English-speaking minority communities and 120 youth.

The Canadian Experience Fund (CEF): Launched in 2019, the objective of the CEF is to help the Canadian tourism sector innovate and grow. Investments focus on five categories, including Aboriginal tourism and inclusion, particularly for the LGBTQ2+ community. In Quebec, the FEC is implemented by CED and has made it possible to support projects such as Fierté Montréal to enhance their offerings and increase the international visibility of the 2019 edition of the festival.

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2019-20.

Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

List of titles and chapters of the audit reports

2019 Fall Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development to the Parliament of Canada, Report 2 – Departmental Progress in Implementing Sustainable Development Strategies

The audit focused on whether the federal departments and agencies reviewed, including CED, contributed to the goal of sustainably managed lands and forests, and whether they indicated in their Departmental sustainable development strategies (DSDS) which targets and actions contribute to the federal goal.

In its review, the Office of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development found that the departments were not required to report on their contributions toward the goals of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) in the supplementary tables of their 2017–2018 departmental results reports (DRR). It was not clear how the reported results for the targets and actions that the departments had planned in their 2017–2020 DSDS contributed to the federal goal of sustainably managed lands and forests.

Two of the recommendations were made to the federal departments and agencies reviewed, including CED.

Recommendation 1: Departments and agencies that contribute to the goal of sustainably managed lands and forests should ensure that the targets and actions in their sustainable development strategies clearly state their contributions to the goal and targets of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

CED’s response: Recommendation accepted. CED will continue to follow Environment and Climate Change Canada’s and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s guidance on the development of measures and targets for its departmental sustainable development strategy, and will continue to respond to inquiries from the individuals responsible for the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, in keeping with the agency’s ongoing commitment to support the achievement of the federal government’s objectives through the agency’s interventions and activities.

Recommendation 2: In the supplementary tables of their departmental results reports, departments and agencies should clearly report on the contributions of their results to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy goals and targets.

CED’s response: Recommendation accepted. CED will continue to follow the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s guidance to report on its contribution to achieving the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy’s outcomes and targets in its departmental results report.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2019–20 requiring a response.

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