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Transition Binder for the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages - 2019

By Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Publish date : March 18, 2020

Table of Contents

  1. 1. Strategic Considerations
  2. 2. Operational Considerations
  3. 3. Administrative Considerations
  4. 4. Ministerial Services
  5. 5. Government Operations

1. Strategic Considerations

On this page

The economy of Quebec and its regions

Economic portrait of Quebec

Quebec has 8.45 million inhabitants, representing 22.6% of the population of Canada. Despite vigorous growth in recent years, Quebec’s economic weight remains less important than its demographic weight within Canada: its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) ($366 billion in 2018) accounts for 18.9% of Canada's GDP. In addition, Quebec represents only 16.4% of international exports and 16.4% of investments in Canada.

Overview

Quebec's economy is diversified. Its industrial fabric is based on services, manufacturing activities, construction and natural resources.

Advanced, emerging and green technologies, as well as start-ups, occupy a growing place in Quebec’s economy. The services sector is by far the largest, both in terms of employment (81%) and production (76%). It is also the sector with the fastest growth in recent decades.

Manufacturing also plays an important role and generates significant economic spin-offs, representing 14% of Quebec's GDP and more than 80% of the value of exports. About 13,570 manufacturing firms are present in Quebec, mainly small businesses: 52% of Quebec small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have fewer than 10 employees.

Primary activities (agriculture, mining, forestry and fishing) represent a small share of employment (2%) and GDP (4%), although they play a crucial role in many rural communities.

More generally, the importance of SMEs in Quebec cannot be underestimated: 241,000 SMEs account for 87% of jobs in the private sector and continue to generate the vast majority of new jobs.

Quebec's economy is also open to the world, with 10,827 exporting companies. In 2018, the value of Quebec exports reached $92.3 billion, an increase of 8.2% over 2017. Major exports include aerospace products, aluminum, paper, and iron ores and concentrates.

Economic issues

Global changes observed around the world, such as an aging population, the growing wealth of emerging countries, increasing consumerism, the 4th industrial revolution, the intensifying innovation and investment race, climate change and the rise of protectionism are exacerbating certain issues for the Quebec economy:

  1. Lower productivity.Quebec is chronically behind in terms of productivity, jeopardizing the competitiveness of its businesses and its prosperity. In terms of productivity per hour worked, Quebec ranks 7th in Canada, which is itself lagging behind other G7 countries (6th).  Innovation and, in particular, the adoption of new technologies are key to making productivity gains and ensuring business growth. However, Quebec companies are slow to make the necessary investments.
  2. Gaps in marketing. Quebec faces marketing shortcomings. In terms of innovation, fewer Quebec companies convert their R&D efforts into patents. In terms of international trade, Quebec exporters remain heavily dependent on the U.S. market. The low scale-up of Quebec companies and the lack of medium-sized and large companies are adversely affecting Quebec's marketing (and productivity) performance. International trade is occurring more than ever through the supply chains of large companies. The integration of SMEs into these chains is crucial.
  3. Difficulties in community adaptation. Many often rural communities in Quebec lack the infrastructure to face technological, economic and climate changes to ensure their prosperity. Many of them are dependent on declining or at-risk industrial activities. Outside major urban centers (Montreal, Quebec, Gatineau and Sherbrooke), the demographic and economic outlook is worrisome. There is both a decrease in the population and an exodus of young people.
  4. Scarcity of labour.Quebec is approaching full employment, with unemployment at a historic low (5.5% in 2018). Labour shortages will continue to put pressure on SMEs: many must postpone projects or refuse contracts because of a lack of workers. The economy is also expected to continue to feel the effects of an aging population, which is slowing down GDP growth. Indeed, an aging population is less likely to participate in the labour market and contributes less to consumer spending (main contribution to GDP).
  5. Declining entrepreneurial intensity and weak business growth. Historically, Quebec has always lagged behind in terms of entrepreneurship. Today, in a global context that is creating new business opportunities, Quebec is facing a shortfall in filling the massive departure of aging entrepreneurs, whose succession often remains inadequately or poorly prepared. According to the Centre de transfert d’entreprises du Québec, by 2020 “an estimated 60,000 potential successors are expected for the 98,000 entrepreneurs who are retiring.” Furthermore, the low scale-up of Quebec companies and the lack of medium-sized and large companies are adversely affecting Quebec's performance in terms of innovation, productivity and marketing.

2019-2020 economic outlook

After vigorous growth in the last two years, with real GDP growth of 2.9% in 2017 and 2.5% in 2018, Quebec’s economy is expected to grow in 2019 and 2020 but at a more moderate pace. Real GDP growth could reach 1.9% in 2019 and 1.4% in 2020.

In 2019, the strength of household consumption and the resumption of private investment will be strong areas of support. On the consumption side, spending will continue to rise even if household debt is at historically very high levels. In the case of investments, they are expected to reach $41.4 billion in 2019—an anticipated gain of 5.7% over 2018. In particular, private expenditures (in construction and on machinery and equipment) will stand out (+10.6%) after a few years of decline. Public spending, meanwhile, is expected to increase by 1.3%.

The Quebec economy in figures

Indicator Value Comment
Population (as of April 1, 2019) 8.45 million 22.6% of the population of Canada
Proportion of the population
aged 65 and over (2018)
18.8% Projected to be 25% in 2031
Gross domestic product [GDP] (2018) $365.6 billion 18.9% of Canada’s GDP
Quebec exports to other countries as a % of GDP (2017) 27.1% Significantly higher than the proportion of exports to other provinces (18.7% in 2017)
Jobs (2018) 4.26 million 22.8% of jobs in Canada
Unemployment rate (2018) 5.5% Slightly below the national average of 5.8%
Employment rate for women
aged 25 to 54 (2018)
82.8% Highest in the country
Job vacancy rate
(first quarter 2019)
3.1% Same as in Canada overall
Average after-tax family income (2017) $63,200 $73,200 in Canada
Business productivity per hour worked (2018) $48.30 $56.00 in Canada
Percentage of employees
who work in SMEs (2018)
[businesses with 1 to 499 employees]
57.1% 54.7% in Canada
Private investment
(Perspectives 2019)
$20.5 billion 12.7% of the total for Canada

Sources: Statistics Canada, tables 17-10-0009-01, 17-10-0005-01, 36-10-0222-01, 14-10-0327-01, 14-10-0325-01, 11-10-0190-01, 36-10-0480-01, 14-10-0215-01 and 34-10-0038-01 / Institut de la statistique du Québec, Perspectives démographiques du Québec et des régions

Sector overview

Present in all sectors, Quebec’s economy overall is diversified. Quebec ranks first among the provinces in terms of an economically diverse industrial structure (according to the Hachman IndexFootnote1). The situation varies, however, among the sub-regions of Quebec.

Economic diversification in Quebec
Diversification in terms of employment Ranks 1st in Canada
Diversification in terms of GDP Ranks 2nd in Canada

Sources: Statistics Canada and internal calculations

The industrial fabric of Quebec’s economy is based, in order of importance, on services, manufacturing, construction and natural resources (primary).

Industrial structure by gross domestic product (GDP) and employment (2018)
GDP Employment
Quebec Canada Quebec Canada
Primary 4% 10% 2% 3%
Primary 6% 7% 6% 8%
Manufacturing 14% 10% 11% 8%
Services 76% 73% 81% 80%

Manufacturing plays a key role in Quebec’s economy and generates significant economic spinoffs. All manufacturing activities are present in Quebec.

Breakdown of the main manufacturing activities, by GDP and employment (2018)
GDP Employment
Quebec Canada Quebec Canada
Manufacturing 100% 100% 100% 100%
Transportation equipment 15% 13% 12% 13%
Food products 14% 14% 14% 14%
Primary metal manufacturing 9% 6% 5% 4%
Metal products 8% 8% 10% 10%
Machinery 7% 9% 8% 9%
Chemical products 7% 10% 5% 6%
Paper 6% 4% 5% 4%
Plastic and rubber products 5% 5% 6% 7%
Wood products 4% 4% 7% 6%
Other 26% 26% 30% 28%

Quebec’s economy by administrative region

Abitibi-Témiscamingue

Key Economic Indicators Abitibi-Témiscamingue Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 147 508 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 1.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -0.2% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.0% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 27.4% 26.8%
25-64 54.0% 54.3%
65 and over 18.6% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 8 165 182 885
First Nation 5 580 92 655
Métis 2 315 69 360
Inuit 30 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 77 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 1.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.4% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 3.8% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 66.1% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 63.6% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 2 635 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 2.3% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 13.3% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 8 385
Share of the Quebec total 2.0% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 8.4% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $52 958 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $29 514 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 31.4% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 7.8% 11.5%
Service sector 68.8% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 4 886 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 1.9% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 208 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 2% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 1 429 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 7% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 13.5% 10.6%
Business export rate 17.6% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 58% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 16 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 3 out of 5 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.1% 2.4%
Number of universities 1 17
Number of CEGEPs 1 77
Number of CCTTs 1 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Val-d'Or (9) and Rouyn-Noranda (24) N/A

Consists of 5 RCMs: Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, Abitibi-Ouest, Abitibi and La Vallée-de-l'Or

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Abitibi-Témiscamingue administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Abitibi-Témiscamingue and Nord-du-Québec Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Abitibi-Témiscamingue administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Abitibi-Témiscamingue and Nord-du-Québec Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Bas-Saint-Laurent administrative region

Key Economic Indicators Bas-Saint-Laurent Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 197 384 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 2.4% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -1.4% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.9% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 23.3% 26.8%
25-64 51.7% 54.3%
65 and over 25% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 3 535 182 885
First Nation 1 085 92 655
Métis 2 140 69 360
Inuit 35 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 91 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 2.1% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.6% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 5.4% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 57.3% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 54.3% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 2 065 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 1.8% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 24.8% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 7 385
Share of the Quebec total 1.9% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 14.4% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $37 474 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $26 339 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 22.6% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 9% 11.5%
Service sector 77.4% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 7 736 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 360 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 380 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 1.9% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 -3.6% 10.6%
Business export rate 16.4% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 59.6% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 14 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 8 out of 8 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.4% 2.4%
Number of universities 1 17
Number of CEGEPs 4 77
Number of CCTTs 7 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Rimouski (4) and Rivière-du-Loup (5) N/A

Made up of 8 RCMs: La Matapédia, La Matanie, La Mitis, Rimouski-Neigette, Les Basques, Rivière-du-Loup, Témiscouata and Kamouraska

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Bas-Saint-Laurent administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Bas-Saint-Laurent Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Bas-Saint-Laurent administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Bas-Saint-Laurent Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Capitale-Nationale

Key Economic Indicators Capitale-Nationale Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 745 135 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 8.9% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 3.4% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.3% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 25% 26.8%
25-64 54.3% 54.3%
65 and over 20.7% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 11 425 182 885
First Nation 6 035 92 655
Métis 4 720 69 360
Inuit 150 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 398 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 9.3% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.9% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 4.1% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 66.1% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 63.4% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 11 865 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 10.4% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 28.3% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 38 385
Share of the Quebec total 9.9% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 15.5% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $51 663 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $29 929 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 14.3% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 6.9% 11.5%
Service sector 85.7% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 21 930 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 8.4% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 965 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 7% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 1 686 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 8.2% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 5.5% 10.6%
Business export rate 22% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.9% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 2 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 6 out of 7 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.1% 2.4%
Number of universities 3 17
Number of CEGEPs 10 77
Number of CCTTs 4 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Québec (69) N/A

Made up of 7 RCMs: Charlevoix-Est, Charlevoix, L'Île-d'Orléans, La Côte-de-Beaupré, La Jacques-Cartier, Québec and Portneuf

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Capitale-Nationale administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Capitale-Nationale Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Capitale-Nationale administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Capitale-Nationale Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Centre-du-Québec

Key Economic Indicators Centre-du-Québec Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 247 333 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 2.9% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 3.4% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.4% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 26.3% 26.8%
25-64 52.2% 54.3%
65 and over 21.5% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 2 940 182 885
First Nation 1 685 92 655
Métis 1 075 69 360
Inuit 45 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 117 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 2.7% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 4.8% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 5.5% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 61% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 57.6% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 3 405 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 29.2% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 10 385
Share of the Quebec total 2.5% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 16.1% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $38 767 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $26 514 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 35.1% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 23.2% 11.5%
Service sector 64.9% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 8 825 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 3.4% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 747 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 6% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 513 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 2.5% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 13.4% 10.6%
Business export rate 26.8% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.8% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 3 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 2 out of 5 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.9% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 3 77
Number of CCTTs 4 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Victoriaville (3) and Drummondville (18) N/A

Made up of 5 RCMs: L'Érable, Bécancour, Arthabaska, Drummond and Nicolet-Yamaska

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Centre-du-Québec administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Centre-du-Québec Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Centre-du-Québec administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Centre-du-Québec Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Chaudière-Appalaches

Key Economic Indicators Chaudière-Appalaches Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population 2018 426 130 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 5.1% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.1% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.3% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 26.1% 26.8%
25-64 52.7% 54.3%
65 and over 21.2% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 4 065 182 885
First Nation 1 785 92 655
Métis 1 925 69 360
Inuit 55 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 220 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 5.2% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 0.7% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 3.3% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 64.6% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 62.5% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 6 710 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 5.9% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 37.2% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 18 385
Share of the Quebec total 4.7% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 27.9% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $42 814 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $28 025 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 31.4% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 18.6% 11.5%
Service sector 68.6% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 14 901 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 5.7% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 1 047 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 8% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 1 004 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 4.9% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 10.3% 10.6%
Business export rate 23.4% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 61.9% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 11 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 6 out of 10 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.8% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 3 77
Number of CCTTs 5 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Saint-Georges (2) and Thetford Mines (32) N/A

Made up of 10 RCMs: L'Islet, Montmagny, Bellechasse, Lévis, La Nouvelle-Beauce, Robert-Cliche, Les Etchemins, Beauce-Sartigan, Les Appalaches and Lotbinière

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Chaudière-Appalaches administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Chaudière-Appalaches Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Chaudière-Appalaches administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Chaudière-Appalaches Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Côte-Nord

Key Economic Indicators Côte-Nord Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 91 213 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 1.1% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -4.7% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.1% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 26.5% 26.8%
25-64 54.7% 54.3%
65 and over 18.8% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 16 455 182 885
First Nation 11 145 92 655
Métis 4 795 69 360
Inuit 235 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 55 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 1.3% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.8% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 4.9% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 63.6% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 60.4% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 2 040 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 1.8% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 22.5% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 6 385
Share of the Quebec total 1.6% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 -15.8% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $67 773 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $28 480 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 30.1% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 11.2% 11.5%
Service sector 70.1% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 2 856 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 1.1% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 84 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 1% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 561 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 2.7% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 -5.3% 10.6%
Business export rate 13.1% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 59.9% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 13 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 6 out of 6 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 1.5% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 2 77
Number of CCTTs 2 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Baie-Comeau (21) and Sept-Îles (109) N/A

Made up of 6 RCMs: La Haute-Côte-Nord, Manicouagan, Sept-Rivières, Caniapiscau, Minganie and Le Golfe-du-Saint-Laurent

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Côte-Nord administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Côte-Nord Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Côte-Nord administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Côte-Nord Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Estrie

Key Economic Indicators Estrie Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 326 476 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 3.9% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 3.3% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.8% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 26.7% 26.8%
25-64 51.8% 54.3%
65 and over 21.5% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 4 045 182 885
First Nation 1 785 92 655
Métis 1 935 69 360
Inuit 95 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 162 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 3.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 3.9% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 4.7% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 61.7% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 58.8% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 4 150 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 3.6% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 16.1% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 12 385
Share of the Quebec total 3.1% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 16.2% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $37 378 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $27 507 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 28.2% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 17.7% 11.5%
Service sector 71.8% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 10 036 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 3.9% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 695 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 5% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 685 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 3.3% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 12.8% 10.6%
Business export rate 30.1% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.4% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 7 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 5 out of 7 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.6% 2.4%
Number of universities 2 17
Number of CEGEPs 3 77
Number of CCTTs 1 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Sherbrooke (19) N/A

Made up of 7 RCMs: Le Granit, Les Sources, Le Haut-Saint-François, Le Val-Saint-François, Sherbrooke, Coaticook and Memphrémagog

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Estrie administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Cantons-de-l'Est Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Estrie administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Cantons-de-l'Est Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine

Key Economic Indicators Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 90 709 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 1.1% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -2.6% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.4% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 20.5% 26.8%
25-64 53% 54.3%
65 and over 26.5% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 8 745 182 885
First Nation 2 630 92 655
Métis 5 725 69 360
Inuit 70 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 34 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 0.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -5% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 12.9% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 51.8% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 45.1% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 600 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 0.5% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 -18.9% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 3 385
Share of the Quebec total 0.8% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 22.3% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $35 524 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $26 832 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 22.7% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 7.8% 11.5%
Service sector 77.3% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 3 877 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 1.5% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 145 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 1% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 107 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 0.5% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 13.8% 10.6%
Business export rate 15.5% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 59.5% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 15 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 6 out of 6 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.1% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 1 77
Number of CCTTs 3 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018   N/A

Made up of 6 RCMs: Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Le Rocher-Percé, La Côte-de-Gaspé, La Haute-Gaspésie, Bonaventure and Avignon

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Lanaudière

Key Economic Indicators Lanaudière Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 507 947 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 6.1% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 4.2% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.8% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 27.6% 26.8%
25-64 54.3% 54.3%
65 and over 18% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 8 175 182 885
First Nation 4 800 92 655
Métis 2 965 69 360
Inuit 35 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 252 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 5.9% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.8% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 5.8% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 63.6% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 59.9% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 4 225 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 3.7% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 17.5% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 14 385
Share of the Quebec total 3.6% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 19.8% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $27 630 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $27 910 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 21.9% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 12.8% 11.5%
Service sector 78.1% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 14 993 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 5.8% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 814 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 6% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 466 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 2.3% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 11% 10.6%
Business export rate 21.6% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.3% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 8 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 4 out of 6 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.7% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 1 77
Number of CCTTs 1 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Joliette (25) N/A

Made up of 6 RCMs: D'Autray, L'Assomption, Joliette, Matawinie, Montcalm and Les Moulins

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Lanaudière administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Lanaudière region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Lanaudière administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Lanaudière region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Laurentides

Key Economic Indicators Laurentides Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 611 019 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 7.3% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 5.7% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.9% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 26.8% 26.8%
25-64 54.9% 54.3%
65 and over 18.3% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 9 810 182 885
First Nation 3 775 92 655
Métis 5 425 69 360
Inuit 110 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 310 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 7.3% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 0.9% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 5.6% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 64.3% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 60.7% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 5 830 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 5.1% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 57.1% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 21 385
Share of the Quebec total 5.5% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 21.6% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $35 155 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $29 472 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 22.4% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 10.6% 11.5%
Service sector 77.6% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 18 984 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 7.3% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 906 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 7% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 636 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 3.1% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 -4.8% 10.6%
Business export rate 25.6% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.5% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 5 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 4 out of 8 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.8% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 2 77
Number of CCTTs 3 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018   N/A

Made up of 8 RCMs: Deux-Montagnes, Thérèse-De Blainville, Mirabel, La Rivière-du-Nord, Argenteuil, Les Pays-d'en-Haut, Les Laurentides and Antoine-Labelle

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Laurentides administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Laurentides region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Laurentides administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Laurentides region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Laval

Key Economic Indicators Laval Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 432 858 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 5.2% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 4% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.7% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 28.9% 26.8%
25-64 53.8% 54.3%
65 and over 17.4% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 2 530 182 885
First Nation 1 145 92 655
Métis 1 170 69 360
Inuit 30 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 237 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 5.6% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 7.1% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 5.3% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 68.9% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 65.3% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 4 610 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 4% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 37.4% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 16 385
Share of the Quebec total 4.1% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 18.7% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $36 812 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $28 277 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 18.2% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 11.7% 11.5%
Service sector 81.8% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 12 255 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 4.7% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 579 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 4% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 533 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 2.6% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 -3.9% 10.6%
Business export rate 29.3% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.4% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 6 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 0 out of 1 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.6% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 1 77
Number of CCTTs 0 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018   N/A

Made up of 1 RCM: Laval

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Laval administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Laval region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Laval administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Laval region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Mauricie

Key Economic Indicators Mauricie Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 269 332 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 3.2% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 1.3% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.2% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 23.3% 26.8%
25-64 52.1% 54.3%
65 and over 24.6% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 7 875 182 885
First Nation 5 690 92 655
Métis 1 945 69 360
Inuit 30 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 119 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 2.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 8.8% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 5.1% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 55.6% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 52.7% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 3 380 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 89.4% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 10 385
Share of the Quebec total 2.5% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 16.3% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $35 740 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $26 243 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 24.5% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 13.2% 11.5%
Service sector 75.5% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 7 835 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 453 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 368 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 1.8% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 -6% 10.6%
Business export rate 21.7% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 10 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 5 out of 6 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.1% 2.4%
Number of universities 1 17
Number of CEGEPs 4 77
Number of CCTTs 4 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Trois-Rivières (20) and Shawinigan (49) N/A

Made up of 6 RCMs: Mékinac, Shawinigan, Trois-Rivières, Les Chenaux Maskinongé and La Tuque

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Mauricie administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's)  Mauricie Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Mauricie administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Mauricie Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Montérégie

Key Economic Indicators Montérégie Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 1 554 282 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 18.5% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 4% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.1% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 27.4% 26.8%
25-64 53.9% 54.3%
65 and over 18.7% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 17 390 182 885
First Nation 9 210 92 655
Métis 6 860 69 360
Inuit 245 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 805 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 18.9% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 4.7% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 4.5% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 65.9% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 62.9% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 18 450 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 16.2% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 23% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 59 385
Share of the Quebec total 15.4% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 20.5% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $38 425 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $29 741 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 22.5% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 13% 11.5%
Service sector 77.5% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 45 549 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 17.5% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 2 488 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 18% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 2 868 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 14% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 8.4% 10.6%
Business export rate 31.9% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62.7% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 4 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 5 out of 15 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.6% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 7 77
Number of CCTTs 4 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Saint-Hyacinthe (12). Granby (42). Salaberry-de-Valleyfield (49) and Sorel-Tracy (114) N/A

Made up of 15 RCMs: Brome-Missisquoi, La Haute-Yamaska, Acton, Pierre-De Saurel, Les Maskoutains, Rouville, Le Haut-Richelieu, La Vallée-du-Richelieu, Longueuil, Marguerite-D'Youville, Roussillon, Les Jardins-de-Napierville, Le Haut-Saint-Laurent, Beauharnois-Salaberry and Vaudreuil-Soulanges

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère  de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Montérégie administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Montérégie region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Montérégie administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving the Montérégie region and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Montréal

Key Economic Indicators Montréal Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 2 029 379 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 24.2% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 4.7% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.6% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 27.5% 26.8%
25-64 56.2% 54.3%
65 and over 16.3% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 13 100 182 885
First Nation 5 910 92 655
Métis 5 745 69 360
Inuit 670 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 1 059 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 24.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 9.9% 5.0%
Unemployment rate, 2018 7.2% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 66.3% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 61.6% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 38 515 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 33.7% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 16.6% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 134 385
Share of the Quebec total 34.8% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 17.9% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $67 449 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $29 612 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 13.5% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 9.9% 11.5%
Service sector 86.5% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 66 844 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 25.7% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 3 256 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 24% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 6 772 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 32.9% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 12.1% 10.6%
Business export rate 41% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 63.5% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 1 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 0 out of 1 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.3% 2.4%
Number of universities 7 17
Number of CEGEPs 27 77
Number of CCTTs 14 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Montréal (44) N/A

Made up of 1 RCM: Montréal

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Montréal administrative region and the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving Montréal and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Montréal administrative region and the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Business Office (BO) serving Montréal and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Nord-du-Québec

Key Economic Indicators Nord-du-Québec Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 45 558 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 0.5% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 3.9% 3.4%
Proportion of women 48.4% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 42% 26.8%
25-64 49.8% 54.3%
65 and over 8.2% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 29 290 182 885
First Nation 16 750 92 655
Métis 575 69 360
Inuit 11 885 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 55 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 1.3% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 2.8% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 4.9% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 63.6% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 60.4% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 2 040 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 1.8% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 22.5% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 4 385
Share of the Quebec total 1.1% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 29.1% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $91 721 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $26 053 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 30.1% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 11.2% 11.5%
Service sector 70.1% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 895 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 0.3% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 13 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 0% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 908 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 4.4% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 51.8% 10.6%
Business export rate 11.1% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 57.2% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 17 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 3 out of 3 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 1.2% 2.4%
Number of universities 0 17
Number of CEGEPs 0 77
Number of CCTTs 0 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018   N/A

Made up of 3 RCMs: Jamésie, Kativik and Eeyou Istchee

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Nord-du-Québec administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Abitibi-Témiscamingue and Nord-du-Québec Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Nord-du-Québec administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Abitibi-Témiscamingue and Nord-du-Québec Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Outaouais

Key Economic Indicators Outaouais Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 390 830 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 4.7% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 3.2% 3.4%
Proportion of women 50.3% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 28.2% 26.8%
25-64 55.8% 54.3%
65 and over 16.1% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 20 690 182 885
First Nation 8 335 92 655
Métis 11 270 69 360
Inuit 145 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 204 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 4.8% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 5.7% 5%
Unemployment rate, 2018 4.9% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 65.9% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 62.7% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 3 245 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 2.8% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 -4.6% 23%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 14 385
Share of the Quebec total 3.5% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 18.8% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $35 153 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $27 318 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 13.5% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 3.4% 11.5%
Service sector 86.5% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 8 079 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 3.1% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 236 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 2% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 491 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 2.4% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 2% 10.6%
Business export rate 14.4% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 62% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 9 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 4 out of 5 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.1% 2.4%
Number of universities 1 17
Number of CEGEPs 3 77
Number of CCTTs 1 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Gatineau (28) N/A

Made up of 5 RCMs: Papineau, Gatineau, Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais, La Vallée-de-la-Gatineau and Pontiac

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Outaouais administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Outaouais Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Outaouais administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Outaouais Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean

Key Economic Indicators Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean Quebec as a whole
Demographics Population. 2018 277 406 8 390 499
Share of the total population of Quebec 3.3% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -0.2% 3.4%
Proportion of women 49.4% 50.1%
By age group. 2018
0-24 24.9% 26.8%
25-64 53.1% 54.3%
65 and over 22% 18.8%
Aboriginal identity population, 2016 14 655 182 885
First Nation 5 305 92 655
Métis 8 770 69 360
Inuit 85 13 945
Labour market Jobs, 2018 (thousands) 124 4 262
Share of the Quebec total 2.9% 100%
Growth from 2013 to 2018 -3% 5.0%
Unemployment rate, 2018 6.1% 5.5%
Participation rate, 2018 57.4% 64.6%
Employment rate, 2018 53.9% 61%
Vacant positions, 2019/Q1 2 500 114 215
Share of the Quebec total 2.2% 100%
Growth from 2018/Q1 to 2019/Q1 10.6% 23.0%
Production GDP, 2017 (billions $) 11 385
Share of the Quebec total 2.8% 100%
Growth from 2012 to 2017 9.5% 17.5%
GDP per capita, 2017 $39 543 $46 392
Disposable income per capita, 2017 $27 085 $28 785
Industrial structure Sector breakdown by jobs, 2018    
Goods-producing sector 24% 20.2%
- Manufacturing 12.5% 11.5%
Service sector 76% 79.8%
Number of SMEs, December 2018 8 885 260 367
Share of the Quebec total 3.4% 100%
Number of SMEs in manufacturing, December 2018 472 13 493
Share of the Quebec total 3% 100%
Private investment, 2019 (millions $) 1 147 20 554
Share of the Quebec total 5.6% 100%
Growth from 2018 to 2019 30.5% 10.6%
Business export rate 15.5% 29.4%
Advanced technology utilization rate, 2014 59.9% 62.4%
2014 ranking among the 17 ARs 12 N/A
Business climate Number of devitalized RCMs according to the 2016 EDI 4 out of 5 71 out of 104
Entrepreneurship rate 2.2% 2.4%
Number of universities 1 17
Number of CEGEPs 5 77
Number of CCTTs 5 59
Name and rank (out of 125) of entrepreneurial cities as per CFIB, 2018 Alma (41) and Saguenay (101) N/A

Made up of 5 RCMs: Le Domaine-du-Roy, Maria-Chapdelaine, Lac-Saint-Jean-Est, Saguenay and Le Fjord-du-Saguenay

Sources: Institut de la statistique du Québec, Statistics Canada, Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (and CED's calculations), Ministère de l'Éducation et de l'Enseignement supérieur, Ministère de l'Économie et de l'Innovation, Wikipedia and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Regional map and business office territory
Map of the Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.
Map Description

Map of the Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean administrative region, the regional county municipalities (RCMs) it covers, the territory of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions' (CED's) Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean Business Office (BO) and the territories served by neighbouring BOs.

CED’s mandate and strategic foundations

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED)

Mission:

“Promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or where opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

Promote cooperation and complementarity with Quebec and communities in Quebec.”

- Section 10 of the Act

We are present in all regions, at the heart of distinct economic dynamics

Sub-regional differences

Factors of influence: workforce; market access; single-industry economies; demographics; urban and rural regions; resources; Indigenous territories

The importance of SMEs in Quebec*

* Industry Canada, Key Small Business Statistics (2019)

Map of Quebec with the head office, business offices and the territories they serve, as well as territories with strong and weak potential.
Map description

Map of Quebec with the head office, business offices and the territories they serve, as well as territories with strong and weak potential.

Our priority areas of intervention respond to the economic challenges of Quebec’s regions

Challenges Shortage of manpower/business succession Gaps in commercialization/ market diversification Lag in productivity and investments Adaptation to climate change Devitalized communities experiencing adaptation difficulties
Priority areas of intervention

Increasing the competitiveness of Quebec businesses

CED supports SMEs in the adoption, adaptation and commercialization of technologies that will improve their productivity, accelerate their growth and enhance their competitiveness in all markets
 
   

Fostering clean growth

CED encourages the development, adoption and commercialization of clean technologies that will increase the industrial productivity and competitiveness of SMEs
 

Encouraging innovative entrepreneurship

CED contributes to the renewal and strengthening of Quebec’s pool of innovative companies by supporting incubators and accelerators, industrial clusters, and established SMEs in their innovation efforts
   
   

Promoting community vitality

CED promotes growth for all by strengthening the entrepreneurial and industrial fabric of regions and communities through diversification, the enhancement of their assets, the promotion of foreign investment and support for economic participation for all and in all regions of Quebec

Our added value – expertise, investments and network

* Three years of data (2016-2017, 2017-2018 and 2018-2019)

** Including a $44-million operating budget

*** 2019-2020 DP

Our approach – operating locally with agility

National Priorities

Place-based approach

Flexibility in implementation

Coordinated response when possible

Credible antennas in the field

Lens (analysis grid) adapted to context

Adapted design of programs and interventions

Our programs and initiatives are flexible and adapted

Regional innovation
  • Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI)
Vitality of communities
  • Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)
  • Community Futures Program (CFP)
  • Official Languages Economic Development Initiative
Targeted ad hoc support
  • Delivering national initiatives
  • Quebec-specific initiatives

CED has an umbrella decree (M-30) to facilitate the implementation of its programs in Quebec

Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI)

Component - Business Scale-up and Productivity

Supports business growth, productivity and competitiveness through innovation:

Component - Regional Innovation Ecosystems

Supports the development of an inclusive regional entrepreneurial environment:

Examples of eligible clients

Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

Strengthening regional economic activity and generating investments and economic spinoffs by acquiring community economic equipment

Asset projects must:

Promoting regional assets to attract international organizations and increase spending by tourists from outside Quebec

Examples of eligible clients

Community Futures Program (CFP)

Program delivered through:

Economic Development Initiative – Linguistic Duality

Fosters the economic development of official language minority communities (OLMCs)

Through activities related to:

Examples of eligible clients

Targeted ad hoc support

Steel and Aluminum Initiative*

Support innovative projects of SMEs operating in the Canadian steel and aluminum supply chain.

Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES)*

Facilitate women entrepreneurs’ access to the talents, skills, networking opportunities and funding they need to grow their businesses

Canadian Experiences Fund (CEF)

Offer new tourism products or experiences, improve what is already offered, and create, renovate or expand tourism facilities

* Call for proposals now closed.

Targeted ad hoc support

Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

Support communities and businesses in the Les Sources and Appalaches RMCs in their efforts to transition to new economic activities

Economic Recovery Initiative for the Town of Lac-Mégantic

Help rebuild the city, support SMEs and NPOs, and make two investment funds available to the community following the 2013 rail accident

Targeted ad hoc support

Incubators and Accelerators Driven by Excellence (IADE) initiative*

Help incubators and accelerators in Quebec regions to position themselves at a world-class level of excellence

CED Fast Forward Challenge**

Support innovative entrepreneurship and young talent, particularly among engineering students, in order to foster Quebec's entrepreneurial renewal

* Call for proposals now closed;

** Competition - Application period now closed

Our interventions have a concrete impact on the ground

Satisfied clients

Leverage effect

* 2016-2017 Annual Satisfaction Survey;

** Leverage effect over 3 years (2016-2017, 2017-2018 and 2018-2019)

Interventions that make a difference

… for SMEs

… for regions

Sources:

* 2017-2018 DRR;

** 2017-2018 Hermes data

Our governance

Manon Brassard
Deputy Minister / President of CED

Manon Brassard took office on June 27, 2016.

From 2010 to 2016, she held Assistant Deputy Minister positions at Citizenship and Immigration Canada (Corporate Services), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Programs) and the Treasury Board Secretariat (Compensation and Labour Relations).

She is back at CED, where she previously served as Vice-President of Operations from 2003 to 2010 and acquired a thorough knowledge of economic development in Quebec.

She has a Bachelor of Law from Laval University and is a member of the Barreau du Québec. She is also an accredited mediator.

CED: Federal partner for regional economic development in Quebec

Our mission

Promote the long-term economic development of all regions of Quebec

Our presence

Our priority areas of intervention

Support high-potential projects that respond to Quebec’s economic challenges
Challenges Shortage of manpower/business succession Gaps in commercialization/ market diversification Lag in productivity and investments Adaptation to climate change Devitalized communities experiencing adaptation difficulties
Priority areas of intervention Increasing the competitiveness of Quebec businesses

Fostering clean growth
Encouraging innovative entrepreneurship
Promoting community vitality

Our approach

Intervene locally with agility:

Our added value

Satisfied clients

Leverage effect

Sources:

* 2016-2017 Annual Satisfaction Survey

** Leverage effect over last three years

National Priorities

Place-based approach

History and context of regional development agencies

Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) are the federal organizations dedicated to the economic development of the regions they serve. The regional development agency model was started more than 50 years ago.

This flexible model evolved from a single organization in the 1960s to four agencies in the 1980s to six since 2009, thus serving all of Canada thanks to a strong federal presence in the regions (see map):

Since November 20, 2019, the RDAs are under the responsibility of the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages, and work closely with member organizations of the Innovation, Science and Industry portfolio.

The Presence of RDAs in the regions
Map of Canada with the regions served by the different federal regional development agencies (RDAs).
Map description:

Map of Canada with the regions served by the different federal regional development agencies (RDAs).

Roles

RDAs rely on their strong presence in the field to develop and implement programs and initiatives that deliver on government priorities based on socio-economic realities and business needs in the regions. RDAs pursue similar objectives and results, while adapting their actions to the needs and realities of their respective regions.
In particular, they:

Specifics

Understanding specific issues in all regions of Canada

Proven place-based intervention approach

Flexible tools tailored to different needs

Well-established relationships with various partners in the regions

Programs and initiatives

RDAs are responsible for delivering programs and initiatives in their respective regions according to regional realities and community needs. Some programs are shared, such as the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program and Community Futures Program (CFP), while others are specific to each RDA, such as CED’s Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

In 2018, through REGI, RDAs became one of four national platforms to support innovation along with the Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) (National Research Council Canada), the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF) (Innovation, Science and Economic Development) and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) (Global Affairs Canada).

RDAs take the lead in implementing Regional Growth Strategies, which leverage federal partnerships to grow the economy and create quality jobs. The scope of these strategies varies greatly from region to region.

2. Operational Considerations

Overview of grant and contribution programs

CED program inventory

Our funding programs are grouped together under three categories that take into account the intended outcomes.

Regional innovation
  • Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI)
Community vitality
  • Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)
  • Community Futures Program (CFP)
  • Official Languages Economic Development Initiative (EDI)
Targeted ad hoc support
  • National initiatives
  • Quebec-specific initiatives
    • With a supplementary budget
    • Without a supplementary budget

Regional innovation

Community vitality

Targeted ad hoc support

NATIONAL INITIATIVES – CED oversees certain temporary national programs implemented in Quebec:

  1. Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES)
  2. Steel and Aluminum Initiative (SAI)
  3. Canadian Experiences Fund (CEF)
  4. QUEBEC-SPECIFIC INITIATIVES – CED is equipped and is present on the ground to support local needs quickly, particularly during crises, as well as to develop initiatives that respond to needs specific to Quebec to achieve government priorities.

    Designed and implemented by CED, with a supplementary budget:

  5. Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
  6. Economic Recovery Initiative for the Town of Lac-Mégantic
  7. Initiative for the development of regional economic infrastructure in Quebec: To support structural projects in the transportation, tourism and research sectors that contribute to regional vitality and attractiveness.
  8. Designed and implemented by CED, without a supplementary budget:

  9. Fast Forward Challenge: To support innovative entrepreneurship and young talent, particularly engineering students, to promote business succession in Quebec.
  10. Incubators and Accelerators Driven by Excellence (IADE) Initiative: To help incubators and accelerators in Quebec regions achieve a world-class level of excellence.

More details about these grant and contribution programs and initiatives can be found in the individual fact sheets.

Main types of funding

CED uses two types of funding: grants and contributions.

These two types of funding are awarded in accordance with various government policies and directives, notably the Policy on Transfer Payments. CED’s choice of funding is based on a number of criteria associated with the types of recipients (e.g., businesses or non-profit organizations) and with the projects they submit. The type of funding is governed by a written agreement with the client.

1. Contributions

Contributions come with various conditions (objectives, costs, activities, results), and clients must submit regular reports on progress and results. Contributions are subject to audits conducted by CED.

There are two types of contributions:

2. Grants

Grants differ from contributions in that the amount paid is not subject to specific conditions governing project delivery, the submission of invoices, or reporting. A grant is an appropriate funding tool for small-scale projects that have a low level of complexity and involve little or no risk (a study, a plan, etc.). CED uses grants sparingly.

Program delivery

CED promotes policies and programs that support government priorities and take into account the economic context in Quebec, Canada and around the world.

Businesses and non-profit organizations (NPOs) wishing to receive a financial contribution from the federal government can contact CED via the agency’s website or through one of CED’s 12 regional business offices. The twelfth business office operates out of CED’s Head Office and oversees special initiatives and projects being carried out in the territories of more than one business office.

All CED advisors are very familiar with the entrepreneurs and NPOs in their region. They are able to discuss projects with SMEs or NPOs, as they are being developed, and are in constant contact with their partners in the federal and provincial governments and in local and regional economic development organizations, with whom they work cooperatively whenever possible.

Advisors will make sure that the projects they discuss with potential clients contribute to the achievement of government priorities and are in line with CED’s priorities and the office’s regional strategy. In the case of projects that do not meet these criteria, proponents will not be encouraged to submit an application; instead, advisors will help them identify other sources of federal or provincial government assistance.

CED sometimes issues calls for projects. This is generally the case when the government plans to introduce a special initiative with a specific budget and a predetermined deadline for project completion. Demand generally exceeds available funds, meaning that some good projects may be rejected. However, when proponents whose projects have not been selected contact CED for feedback, CED advisors try to direct them towards partners that are most likely to be able to provide assistance.

Program delivery process

The diagram below illustrates the delivery process for CED programs. Each project is subject to rigorous review and monitoring, guided by Treasury Board policies and directives and best business practices. The process is designed to achieve the results the government wants, to serve Canadians well, and to manage public funds well. It includes service standards that are customer-oriented and comply with the ISO standard. Its different steps are detailed below.

Diagram outlining CED's program delivery process. The first part of the process is directly influenced by government priorities. This includes the steps of project development and calls for proposals during which client visits and meetings occur, pre-eligibility assessments and stakeholder consultations by business offices, which are continuously present. Once the application has been submitted, we proceed with the project analysis and approval step. Service standards for these steps extend from 35 to 65 days. These steps include an analysis of the client’s business plan, the application of evaluation criteria, integrated risk management, quality review and control and a recommendation for funding by the business office. The second part of the process involves accountability. Contribution payment and monitoring occur from 6 to 36 months following the agreement. During this period, the business office receives the client’s claims and makes the necessary modifications. The repayment moratorium for SMEs and the monitoring period for NPOs occur during the following 2 to 3 years. SMEs have approximately 5 years to complete their repayment and come to the end of the agreement. Monitoring of financial statements, modifications and performance measurement will then be done by the business office.
Text version:

Diagram outlining CED's program delivery process. The first part of the process is directly influenced by government priorities. This includes the steps of project development and calls for proposals during which client visits and meetings occur, pre-eligibility assessments and stakeholder consultations by business offices, which are continuously present. Once the application has been submitted, we proceed with the project analysis and approval step. Service standards for these steps extend from 35 to 65 days. These steps include an analysis of the client’s business plan, the application of evaluation criteria, integrated risk management, quality review and control and a recommendation for funding by the business office. The second part of the process involves accountability. Contribution payment and monitoring occur from 6 to 36 months following the agreement. During this period, the business office receives the client’s claims and makes the necessary modifications. The repayment moratorium for SMEs and the monitoring period for NPOs occur during the following 2 to 3 years. SMEs have approximately 5 years to complete their repayment and come to the end of the agreement. Monitoring of financial statements, modifications and performance measurement will then be done by the business office.

* In the case of a call for proposals, there is no project development stage. The client submits an application using a form that can be adapted to the requirements of the initiative. In order to select the projects that best meet the objectives of the initiative, temporary teams of analysts are set up to assess the eligibility of the projects and prioritize them based on pre-established criteria.

Analysing and approving projects

Projects must contribute to the achievement of the government priorities assigned to CED. They are subsequently analysed to assess the completion risk level and, if applicable, the proponent’s repayment capacity.

Factors such as the degree of experience of the client’s management team, the viability of the funding arrangement, and compliance with international trade agreements are taken into account.

Each analysis includes a compliance and consistency verification. Once a project is ready and at your convenience, it may be submitted to you for guidance. In all cases, the project is subsequently submitted to the Deputy Minister / President for approval.

Issuing and managing contribution agreements (contracts)

Once a project has been approved, the client must sign a contribution agreement letter; this is a contract between the client and the Government of Canada. The project can now be announced publicly. In all cases, projects must be proactively disclosed.

The agreement, which may cover a period of 8 to 10 years, is generally based on the following model:

Contribution payment – Contributions are paid out based on the project implementation timeline and upon submission of claims for costs incurred and, when required, supporting documentation.

Payments are typically spread out over a period of 6 to 36 months.

Grant payment – Grants are generally awarded in the form of a lump-sum payment, without any supporting documentation required, upon signature of the agreement. CED requires that the client submit a project completion report after the end date of the project.

Historically, CED rarely awards grants, preferring non-repayable contributions instead.

Moratorium and repayment – At the end of the project and after the contribution has been paid out, clients who received repayable assistance benefit from a repayment moratorium period, usually two years.

Clients must then make regular interest-free contribution repayment installments that can be spread out over a period of up to five years.

Clients receiving non-repayable assistance are subject to a two-year monitoring period after the end of the project; the agreement remains in effect during this period.

Monitoring – Clients are regularly audited throughout the course of an agreement based on the level of risk of the project. Amendments to the agreement may be required to respond to changes in circumstances or to address certain issues.

CED may put a client in default and take back its contribution in order to protect public funds, e.g., if a client declares bankruptcy or abandons its project.

Service standards

CED is committed to providing its clients with professional, responsive, courteous, confidential and timely service:

For the 2018–2019 fiscal year, CED obtained the following results:

Program details

Regional innovation

Regional economic growth through innovation

The Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program, which has been in place since 2018, is a grant and contribution program that supports innovation as a key means of fostering business growth. REGI is shared by all the regional development agencies (RDAs); however, each RDA administers the program and funds projects based on its own specific situation and budget.

Objectives

The objectives of REGI are as follows:

Who can submit projects?

The main eligible recipients are:

Projects can be submitted to CED as soon as they are ready (on an ongoing basis).

Funding

Two types of funding are provided under this program:

REGI has two components:

1. Business Scale-up and Productivity (BSP)

Funding under this component is generally awarded to SMEs that submit innovative projects aimed at growing their business, enhancing their productivity and/or marketing their products.

What projects are eligible? – CED prioritizes funding for projects by

2. Regional Innovation Ecosystems (REI)

An ecosystem is made up of many different players who, through the services they provide and their various roles and expertise, work together to foster growth of businesses in a given region or sector. Funding provided under this component is generally awarded to NPOs that contribute to the creation of an entrepreneurial environment conducive to innovation in order to meet business needs.

What projects are eligible? – CED prioritizes funding for projects that

Community vitality

Quebec Economic Development Program

The Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), which has been in place since 2012, is one of the regular grant and contribution programs that support regional community development and economic diversification.

Objectives

The objectives of the QEDP are as follows:

Who can submit projects?

The main eligible recipients are:

Projects can be submitted to CED as they are ready (on an ongoing basis).

Funding

Two types of funding are provided under this program:

QEDP has two components:

1. Local development

Funding provided under this component primarily targets the development of local entrepreneurship and the planning and funding of community economic facilities (CEF) that are likely to contribute to the economic growth or vitality of the regions.

What projects are eligible? CED prioritizes funding for projects targeting:

Example of a project:

CED provides funding for a cheese producer’s expansion project involving the acquisition of various pieces of equipment to enable the business to increase its production in the regional market in order to meet growing demand.

2. Development and promotion of assets and the regions

Funding supports efforts to promote assets and the regions, primarily in the tourism industry, with a view to boosting their attractiveness and competitive positioning. CED’s objective is to increase economic benefits, notably spending by tourists from outside Quebec (in the regions) and from outside Canada (in Montreal). In Montreal, CED’s targeted benefits also include operational spending by international organizations.

What projects are eligible? CED prioritizes funding for projects by:

Examples of projects:

CED provides support for the implementation of a plan to market, outside Quebec, tourism products from five tourism regions. The project focuses on showcasing products with significant and distinctive drawing power through alliances with product sponsors, advertising, the distribution of promotional material, participation in events and media relations.

CED provides funding for the operations of an international organization based in Montreal that is associated with the United Nations (UN). This support will help increase Montreal’s influence and visibility around the world and bring in new capital.

Community Futures Program

The Community Futures Program (CFP) is a national program administered and implemented by the regional development agencies (RDAs). The implementation of the program takes into account the realities and needs of rural communities in the various regions. This program supports specific non-profit organizations that help rural communities showcase their capabilities and take charge of their own local economic development.

Objectives

The program has three objectives:

The organizations below receive funding under the CFP

In Quebec, CED awards funding solely to the following organizations:

Funding

The five-year (2019–2024) agreements between CED and the various organizations represent a financial commitment of $33.4M / year.

Funding, which is provided in the form of non-repayable contributions, targets all of the organization’s operating costs. Funding for organizations is partially adjusted based on the economic situation and structure of the area covered.

Financial assistance allows these organizations (CFDCs and BDCs) to provide the following services in their rural areas:

Economic Development Initiative – Official Languages

The Economic Development Initiative (EDI) – Official Languages (the Initiative) supports the Government of Canada’s language strategy. This strategy is outlined in the Action Plan for Official Languages – 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future, which aims to ensure the vitality of both English and French in Canada by focusing on three pillars: Strengthening our communities; Strengthening access to services; and Promoting a bilingual Canada.

In Quebec, the Initiative is implemented by CED according to the terms and conditions of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) and has an annual budget of $1.8M.

Objectives

The goal of the Initiative is to foster the economic development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) by various means, such as innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and economic diversification. In Quebec, the Initiative targets English-speaking communities.

Who can submit projects?

Projects can be submitted to CED as soon as they are ready (on an ongoing basis).

Funding
Specific conditions

Some of the regular intervention parameters are more flexible in the case of the EDI. The following activities are authorized:

Example of projects:

CED funds the operations of an NPO that provides entrepreneurship support for young Anglophones aged 16 to 35 looking to start up a business.

CED provides funding for the purchase of equipment by a start-up co-op located in a devitalized RCM where 85% of the population is English-speaking. The co-op, which operates in the food processing sector, makes northern berry products.

Targeted ad hoc support

Women Entrepreneurship Strategy

Launched in October 2018 and in effect until the end of 2023, the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES) is a national initiative aimed at helping women entrepreneurs overcome barriers to the growth of their business. WES is administered by the regional development agencies.

In Quebec, WES is implemented by CED in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program.

WES was the subject of three calls for proposals, which have now ended. Recipients have been selected, and CED is managing the agreements signed with them.

Objectives

WES aims to double the number of women-owned businesses by 2025 and achieve the following objectives:

Funding

Non-repayable contributions.

The Strategy had two components:

1. Ecosystem Fund – Regional Stream

The goal of this fund was to promote the growth of women-owned and -led businesses by improving their access to programs and services provided by non-profit organizations (NPOs).

The entire budget—$15.9M over five years (2018–2023)—has been committed.

Who could submit projects?

NPOs that provide services aimed at supporting the development and growth of businesses owned or led by a woman. The establishment of partnerships among organizations at the regional level was encouraged.

What projects were eligible?

Example of a project:

CED provided funding for an organization that assists and informs women owned businesses in Quebec to help them take advantage of opportunities provided through large companies’ supplier diversity programs. The objective is to build their capacity to identify market opportunities and access potential clients.

A national component was also implemented to support organizations offering services to women entrepreneurs. It was coordinated by Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED).

2. Women Entrepreneurship Fund

This fund provided direct non-repayable funding (up to $100,000) to women-owned and -led businesses for projects with a maximum duration of 12 months, to help them grow their businesses and pursue market opportunities abroad.

This stream had a budget of $5.4M over two years. The budget envelope has been fully committed.

Who could submit projects?

What projects were eligible?

Example of a project:

CED is funding a project by a woman-owned high-tech company aimed at developing new markets in the U.S. and Europe through the implementation of a structured marketing strategy that includes the creation and updating of promotional tools and participation in trade shows.

Steel and Aluminum Initiative

En Effective from March 11, 2019, to March 31, 2020, the Steel and Aluminum Initiative (SAI) is a national initiative aimed at supporting SMEs operating within Canadian supply chains that were affected by global market dynamics.

The initiative is being delivered by the regional development agencies (RDAs). In Quebec, it had a budget of $26.2M and was implemented by CED in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program.

The SAI was carried out via a call for proposals, which has now ended. Recipients have been selected, and CED is managing the agreements with them.

Objectives

The objectives of the SAI were as follows: 

Available funding

The funding was provided in the form of non-repayable contributions ranging from $150K to $1M. The awarding of this type of funding to businesses was exceptional.

Implementation

Who could submit projects?

To be eligible, businesses had to:

What projects were eligible?

CED gave priority to projects that fostered the growth and expansion of SMEs through the adoption of technologies or that aimed to enhance business productivity and competitiveness.

All projects have to be completed by March 31, 2020. No expenses incurred after that date will be accepted.

Example of a project:

CED provided funding for a business that is a sub-contractor integrated into a number of prime contractors’ value chains. The funding enabled the business to acquire new digital production equipment, fit up the production area in its plant and implement a computerized production resource planning system.

Canadian Experiences Fund (CEF)

The Canadian Experiences Fund (CEF) is a two-year (2019–2021) national initiative aimed at supporting the tourism industry. It is part of the Creating Middle Class Jobs: A Federal Tourism Growth Strategy. The CEF is administered by the regional development agencies (RDAs).

In Quebec, the CEF has a budget of $11.5M. It is implemented by CED in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

A call for proposals was launched in May 2019. The project application period has ended. Recipients have been selected, and CED is now managing the ensuing agreements that have been signed with them.

Objectives

The goal of the CEF was to support the development of products and experiences that showcase Canada’s assets, as well as the development of tourism activities that take place outside large cities and in seasons other than summer. The priorities were to:

Who could submit projects?

The main eligible beneficiaries were:

Funding

The funding was generally provided in the form of non-repayable contributions. The funding parameters were different from those normally used.

What projects were eligible?

To be eligible, the projects had to foster growth and diversification in the tourism sector. For example:

Example of a project:

CED provided funding for a project submitted by a regional song festival involving the upgrading of reception and accommodation infrastructure. The goal of the project was to increase spending by tourists from outside Quebec. CED’s contribution primarily served to improve and fit up the big tent.

Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

In effect from June 11, 2013, to March 31, 2020, the Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile (the Initiative) has a budget of $50M and is intended to assist communities and businesses in the Des Sources and Des Appalaches regional county municipalities (RCMs) in their efforts to transition to new economic activities.

The Initiative is implemented by CED in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

The Initiative’s implementation is almost complete, and the budget has been fully committed.

Objectives

The goal of the Initiative is to support the economic transition of communities in the Des Sources and Des Appalaches RCMs affected by the shutdown of the chrysotile industry.

Who can submit projects?

The main eligible recipients are:

Funding
The Initiative has two components

1. Economic development projects submitted by businesses and organizations ($35M)

Funding is primarily awarded to SMEs that submit expansion or equipment acquisition projects, or projects involving the development of new services. Financial assistance for NPOs may, for example, be used to develop recovery plans or strategies to attract investment.

Example of a project:

CED has provided support for a project by a machinery manufacturer targeting the expansion of its plant and the acquisition of two new pieces of equipment (a laser cutter and a press brake). The project is part of a broad investment plan aimed at strengthening the business’s capacity to meet the demands of prime contractors in Quebec and better integrate into their value chains.

2. Public infrastructure projects ($15M)

Funding under this component targets such activities as the construction, repair and upgrading of public infrastructure (e.g., roads, drinking water treatment and distribution systems and industrial parks or motels) that supports the economic development of businesses or targeted communities.

Example of a project:

CED is funding a project to build a gas pipeline extension to supply natural gas to an industrial park so that companies currently operating in the area can convert to this form of energy.

Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic

Following the train accident that occurred on July 6, 2013, CED implemented the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic (the Initiative) to support businesses and the community in Lac Mégantic. The Initiative, which has been extended until March 31, 2023, has a $35M budget and is carried out in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

Objective

The objective of the Initiative is to provide support for the economic recovery and revitalization of Lac-Mégantic.

Who can submit projects?
Funding

Two types of funding are provided under this initiative: grants and contributions, with certain specific conditions:

The Initiative has three components:

1. Town reconstruction projects

Up to $20M to restore, improve or build public infrastructure in the town of Lac Mégantic.

What projects are eligible?

Example of a project:

CED is providing financial assistance for a project to redevelop Lac Mégantic’s downtown core. The project will include the construction of public infrastructure and the creation of parks, notably the former Musi-Café’s Espace Mémoire. The funding will support the municipality’s revitalization efforts.

2. Business and organization support projects

Up to $10M in direct assistance for businesses and organizations for the economic and commercial recovery of Lac-Mégantic.

What projects are eligible?

Example of a project:

CED provided funding to help a Lac-Mégantic business modernize and automate its stringing and soldering processes. The funding allowed the company to increase its production capacity and pursue its growth in the community.

3. Investment funds

Up to $5M for two local investment funds administered by the Mégantic region CFDC.

What projects are eligible?

Initiative for the Development of Economic Infrastructure in Quebec

Launched on August 27, 2019, the Initiative for the Development of Regional Economic Infrastructure in Quebec (the Initiative) promotes the economic development of Quebec communities through targeted investments in growth-generating projects that contribute to the vitality and attractiveness of the regions.

Unique to Quebec, the Initiative will last four years and a minimum of $10 million by component will be invested. It will be implemented through CED’s regular programs, namely, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) and the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program.

Purpose

The Initiative aims to support infrastructure projects that strengthen the economic development capacity of the regions.

Who may submit a project

The main eligible beneficiaries are:

Financial assistance
The initiative includes three components

1. Transportation infrastructure

This component aims to support the construction, modernization or expansion of transportation infrastructure (airport, rail, port) projects that benefit SMEs and strengthen the regional economic ecosystem.

A minimum of $10 million will be invested in this component, through the QEDP.

2. Tourism infrastructure

This component aims to support the construction, modernization or expansion of tourism infrastructure projects likely to improve the attractiveness of regional tourism.

A minimum of $10 million will be invested in this component, through the QEDP.

3. Research infrastructure

This component aims to support equipment acquisition projects to foster the development of applied research and technology transfer to business initiatives.

A minimum of $10 million will be invested in this component through REGI.

CED’s Fast Forward Challenge

CED’s Fast Forward Challenge (the Challenge) is an entrepreneurial competition targeting engineering students and recent engineering graduates aimed at helping them carry out their business projects. Initiated by CED, the Challenge was implemented according to the adjusted terms and conditions of the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program.

The Challenge was held in the spring of 2019 and had a budget of $500K ($50K each for the 10 selected projects).

The competition is now closed. The recipients have been selected and announced, and CED is currently managing the agreements signed with them.

Objectives

The Challenge was an innovative pilot project designed to test one of the five new methods put forward by the Treasury Board to improve the delivery of its services to a client group that is atypical for CED. An evaluation is currently under way to determine follow-up, as required.

Who can submit projects?

To be eligible to participate, start-ups had to have been incorporated in Canada for less than three years; be based in Quebec; have at least two shareholders, including people aged 18 to 39 and engineering students; and be looking to market an innovation.

Funding

The funding awarded to the winning businesses took the form of a $50K grant. On August 30, 2019, 10 prizes were given out, for a total of $500K.

How it worked

The Challenge was carried out as a competition, with a call for proposals and an application evaluation process. Some 72 businesses from various regions of Quebec took part in the competition. Of these, 20 finalists were presented to a panel of experts on May 27 and 28, 2019.

Example of a project:

CED provided support for a business that had designed artificial intelligence-based software for municipal water management—i.e., a solution targeting at-risk water mains and a solution to predict water quality in real time—to help it fulfill its business plan.

Incubators and Accelerators Driven by Excellence (IADE)

Incubators and Accelerators Driven by Excellence (IADE) is an initiative that encourages Quebec incubators / accelerators to raise their level of performance in order to achieve the status of world class organizations. These organizations support young, innovative businesses with high growth potential (start-ups). Incubators and accelerators play a key role in the Quebec innovation ecosystem by providing essential support for start-ups at all stages of their existence (creation, development and growth); they act as nurseries for talent and innovation.

The IADE was developed by CED and draws on existing budgets in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program.

A call for proposals launched under the IADE, which has a budget of $12M over four years, ran from May 6 to June 7, 2019. The recipient selection phase has been completed.

Objectives

The objectives of the IADE are to:

Who could submit projects?

To be eligible, the incubators and accelerators had to:

Under this initiative, priority was given to co-operative projects and projects that encourage the grouping together of some of the existing strengths of the start-up ecosystem to increase its impact and benefits.

Funding

Funding provided under this initiative took the form of non-repayable contributions.

Eligible activities

To be eligible, the activities put in place by the incubators and accelerators had to foster the innovative businesses’ growth and international competitiveness. These activities could include:

Programs and initiatives in effect

Programs and Initiatives Acronym Start Date End Date Process for submitting a project Grants & Contributions Budget
Regional Economic Growth through Innovation REGI October 18, 2018 N.A. Continuously $145.2M / 2019-2020
Quebec Economic Development Program QEDP April 1, 2012 N.A. Continuously $51.2M / 2019-2020
Community Futures Program CFP 1995 N.A.

N.A.

Renewed agreements

$33.4M / year
Economic Development Initiative - Official Languages EDI 2018 N.A. Continuously $1.8M / 2019-2020
Women Entrepreneurship Strategy WES October 18, 2018

Entrepreneurship component: March 31, 2021

Ecosystem component: March 31, 2023

Calls for proposals completed

$5.4M / 2.5 years

$15.9M / 5 years

Steel and Aluminum Initiative SAI March 11, 2019 March 31, 2020 Call for proposals completed $26.2M / 1 year
Canadian Experiences Fund CEF May 21, 2019 March 31, 2021 Call for proposals completed $11.5M / 2 years
Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile -- June 11, 2013 March 31, 2020 Continuously $50M / 7 years
Funding for the economic recovery of the town of Lac-Mégantic -- August 8, 2013 March 31, 2023 Continuously $35M / 10 years
Initiative for infrastructure development -- August 27, 2019 March 31, 2023 Continuously

$79.5M / 4 years

Under approval

CED Fast Forward Challenge -- February 8, 2019 March 31, 2020 Completed competition $500,000 / 1 year
Incubators and Accelerators Driven by Excellence IADE May 6, 2019 March 31, 2023 Call for proposals completed $12M / 4 years

Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB)

The goal of the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy is to optimize the economic benefits generated by government defence and security acquisitions valued at $100 million or more. It is not a grants and contributions program used by the government to fund projects; rather, through its procurement processes, the government favours bidders maximizing their domestic business activities.

Although the ITB Policy is the responsibility of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, its implementation is partially assumed by the regional development agencies (RDAs). Building on their economic development mandate and their active presence in the regions, the RDAs promote opportunities associated with bidders’ ITB obligations, provide SMEs with strategic advice, and organize networking activities for companies of all sizes.

Objectives

The ITB Policy is linked to the Defence Procurement Strategy, which provides the framework for the procurement of equipment and services for the Canadian Armed Forces and the Canadian Coast Guard. Under the Policy, companies selected through the procurement process are required to undertake economic activities in Canada equal to the value of the contract.

The Policy specifies the type of benefits sought. The evaluation of bids received during procurement processes focuses in part on the value and quality of the proposed benefits to Canada. Once contracts are awarded, the government ensures that companies meet their ITB obligations.

The ITB policy aims to:

Considerations

In Canada, the ITB Policy has been applied to 144 procurement contracts since 1986, leading to the establishment of $47 billion in economic activity obligations. Of these, three-quarters have already been met.

A number of ITB investments have been made in Quebec. For example, in recent years, 30 large companies and prime contractors have invested in 80 defence procurement projects. Hundreds of SMEs and five Quebec research centres and educational organizations (McGill University, the École nationale d'aérotechnique, the École Polytechnique de Montréal, the Université de Sherbrooke and the École de technologie supérieure) have benefited from ITB investments. These investments were made in the aerospace (70%), land (21%), naval (8%) and space (1%) sectors.

CED is co-operating with the Government of Quebec, which is actively working to ensure that the Quebec defence sector—which accounts for approximately 28% of all defence sector jobs in Canada—can leverage the ITB Policy.

Current CED interventions

Unlike in other regions of Canada, the absence of a defence-specific industry association in Quebec means that the relevant RDA, CED, is called upon to assume a more important role as the lead for the ITB Policy and the promotion of business opportunities by:

3. Administrative Considerations

Organizational structure

CED’s organization chart

Organizational chart demonstrating CED’s organizational structure. The Minister sits at the top of the chart, followed by the Deputy Minister/President (DM/P), who also chairs the Quebec Federal Council. Legal Services also fall under the DM/P’s responsibility. The Vice-President of Policy and Communications is responsible for the Policy, Economic Intelligence and Results, Governmental Affairs and Communications sectors; the Vice-President of Corporate Services is responsible for the People, Culture and Workplace, Departmental Finance, Information and Technological Solutions, Exams and Incubator sectors; and the Vice-President of Operations is responsible for the Customer Experience and Business Intelligence, Strategic Partnerships (Inter-regional Initiatives, Grand Montréal and Québec¿Chaudière-Appalaches) and Regional Operations (Abitibi-Témiscamingue¿Nord-du-Québec, Gaspésie¿Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Bas-Saint-Laurent, Mauricie, Cantons-de-l'Est, Outaouais, Centre-du-Québec, Saguenay¿Lac-Saint-Jean and Côte-Nord BOs) sectors, while the Chief of Staff is responsible for the Corporate Secretariat (Access to Information and Parliamentary Affairs, Accountability) and Departmental Planning. All four report to the DM/P.
Text version:CED’s organization chart

Organizational chart demonstrating CED’s organizational structure. The Minister sits at the top of the chart, followed by the Deputy Minister/President (DM/P), who also chairs the Quebec Federal Council. Legal Services also fall under the DM/P’s responsibility. The Vice-President of Policy and Communications is responsible for the Policy, Economic Intelligence and Results, Governmental Affairs and Communications sectors; the Vice-President of Corporate Services is responsible for the People, Culture and Workplace, Departmental Finance, Information and Technological Solutions, Exams and Incubator sectors; and the Vice-President of Operations is responsible for the Customer Experience and Business Intelligence, Strategic Partnerships (Inter-regional Initiatives, Grand Montréal and Québec¿Chaudière-Appalaches) and Regional Operations (Abitibi-Témiscamingue¿Nord-du-Québec, Gaspésie¿Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Bas-Saint-Laurent, Mauricie, Cantons-de-l'Est, Outaouais, Centre-du-Québec, Saguenay¿Lac-Saint-Jean and Côte-Nord BOs) sectors, while the Chief of Staff is responsible for the Corporate Secretariat (Access to Information and Parliamentary Affairs, Accountability) and Departmental Planning. All four report to the DM/P.

Biographies of senior management

Deputy Minister / President

Manon Brassard
Deputy Minister / President

On June 7, 2016, the Prime Minister announced the appointment of Manon Brassard as President of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec. Ms. Brassard took office on June 27, 2016.

From 2010 until 2016, Ms. Brassard held the positions of Assistant Deputy Minister at Citizenship and Immigration Canada (Corporate Services), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Programs) and the Treasury Board Secretariat (Compensation and Labour Relations).

Ms. Brassard is returning to the Agency, where she was Vice-President of Operations from 2003 to 2010. Her extensive knowledge of the economic development of Quebec’s regions is a great asset for the organization and its mandate.

Ms. Brassard has a Bachelor of Law from Université Laval and is a member of the Barreau du Québec. She is also an accredited mediator.

Vice-President – Policy and Communications

Jean-Frédéric Lafaille
Vice -President, Policy and Communications

On July 2018, Mr. Jean-Frédéric Lafaille joined Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions as Vice-President, Policy and Communications.

Mr. Lafaille started his career with the federal public service in 2003, while completing a doctorate in political philosophy at the University of Oxford.

He worked in policy and program development and implementation at the Department of Natural Resources Canada, where he was notably responsible for the restructuring of the nuclear Crown Corporation, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.

From 2016 to 2018, Mr. Lafaille worked at the Privy Council Office as Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Special Projects. Reporting to the Deputy Clerk, Mr. Lafaille led interdepartmental governance to strengthen the federal government's ability to attract foreign investment to Canada.

Vice-President – Operations

Mark Quinlan
Vice-President, Operations

Mr. Mark Quinlan has served as Vice-President, Operations, at Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) since July 2017.

Prior to that and for two years, he was the Regional Director General, Quebec Region, at Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC). Up to August 2015, he held the position of Director General of Real Property and Service Integration for the Canada Revenue Agency at PSPC. In 2012, Mark was appointed Executive Director, Strategic Reviews, reporting to the Associate Deputy Minister of PSPC.

Mr. Quinlan joined the public service in 2011 as Senior Director, Internal Services, within the Administrative Services Review Sector of the Privy Council Office.

He holds a Bachelor of Commerce from the John Molson School of Business (Concordia University), a Bachelor of Laws from the Université du Québec à Montréal and a graduate degree in notarial law from the Université de Sherbrooke.

Vice-President – Corporate Services

Guy Lepage
Vice-President, Corporate Services Sector

Guy Lepage has held the position of Vice-President, Corporate Services at CED since April 2017.

Prior to this, he was Regional Director of the Accommodation and Portfolio Management Directorate, Quebec Region, at Public Services and Procurement Canada.

From 2003 to 2013, Mr. Lepage held various management positions at the Société des casinos du Québec.

He holds a Master of Business Administration (MBA) from the Université du Québec à Montréal. In addition, he recently completed a program in finance and accounting for executives, offered by the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada.

DM’s Office

Mandate and responsibilities

The Office of the Deputy Minister / President:

Structure

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Office of the Deputy Minister/President (Manon Brassard). She chairs the Quebec Federal Council. She supervises the Chief of Staff (Simon Labrecque), who is responsible for Integrated Planning and Risk Management, and the Corporate Secretariat (Access to Information, Accountability and Parliamentary Affairs).
Text version:Deputy-minister structure organizational chart

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Office of the Deputy Minister/President (Manon Brassard). She chairs the Quebec Federal Council. She supervises the Chief of Staff (Simon Labrecque), who is responsible for Integrated Planning and Risk Management, and the Corporate Secretariat (Access to Information, Accountability and Parliamentary Affairs).

Key Activities

Chief of Staff

Corporate Secretariat

Planification, Modernization and Accountability

Quebec Federal Council

Policy and Communications

Mandate and responsibilities

Guides, oversees and communicates CED’s programs and interventions in accordance with government priorities and Quebec’s economic reality, and maintains government relations.

Structure

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Policy and Communications Sector. The Vice-President (Jean-Frédéric Lafaille) is responsible for the Policy, Economic Intelligence and Results Branch (Policy and Programs Directorate and Economic Intelligence Directorate), managed by Director General Marie-Eve Harvey; the Governmental Affairs Directorate – located in Gatineau (Cabinet Affairs, Federal-Provincial Relations, Partnerships and Liaison and Industrial and Technological Benefits), managed by Director Nancy D’Agostino; and the Communications Directorate (Digital Strategies and Branding, Strategic and Internal Communications and Departmental Announcements and Regional Communications), managed by Director Caroline Hilt.
Text version:Policy and communications sector structure organizational chart

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Policy and Communications Sector. The Vice-President (Jean-Frédéric Lafaille) is responsible for the Policy, Economic Intelligence and Results Branch (Policy and Programs Directorate and Economic Intelligence Directorate), managed by Director General Marie-Eve Harvey; the Governmental Affairs Directorate – located in Gatineau (Cabinet Affairs, Federal-Provincial Relations, Partnerships and Liaison and Industrial and Technological Benefits), managed by Director Nancy D’Agostino; and the Communications Directorate (Digital Strategies and Branding, Strategic and Internal Communications and Departmental Announcements and Regional Communications), managed by Director Caroline Hilt.

Key Activities

Policy, Economic Intelligence and Results Branch

Governmental Affairs Directorate

Communications Directorate

Priority Files 2019-2020

Operations

Mandate and Responsibilities

Structure

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Operations Sector. The Vice-President (Mark Quinlan) is responsible for the Strategic Partnerships Branch (Business Offices: Inter-Regional Initiatives, Greater Montréal and Québec¿Chaudière-Appalaches), managed by Director General Jean-Philippe Brassard; the Regional Operations Branch (Business Offices: Abitibi-Témiscamingue¿Nord-du-Québec, Bas-Saint-Laurent, Cantons-de-l'Est, Centre-du-Québec, Côte-Nord, Gaspésie¿Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Outaouais and Saguenay¿Lac-Saint-Jean), managed by Director General Georges Arseneau; and the Client Experience and Business Information Directorate (Business Process and Information Development and Modernization, Grants and Contributions Budget Monitoring, and Grants and Contributions Management System), managed by Director Keltoum Bouhabel.
Text version:Operations sector structure organizational chart

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Operations Sector. The Vice-President (Mark Quinlan) is responsible for the Strategic Partnerships Branch (Business Offices: Inter-Regional Initiatives, Greater Montréal and Québec¿Chaudière-Appalaches), managed by Director General Jean-Philippe Brassard; the Regional Operations Branch (Business Offices: Abitibi-Témiscamingue¿Nord-du-Québec, Bas-Saint-Laurent, Cantons-de-l'Est, Centre-du-Québec, Côte-Nord, Gaspésie¿Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Outaouais and Saguenay¿Lac-Saint-Jean), managed by Director General Georges Arseneau; and the Client Experience and Business Information Directorate (Business Process and Information Development and Modernization, Grants and Contributions Budget Monitoring, and Grants and Contributions Management System), managed by Director Keltoum Bouhabel.

Key Activities

Strategic Partnerships Branch (SPB)

Regional Operations Branch (ROB)

Client Experience and Business Information Directorate (CEBID)

Key Files 2019-2020

Corporate Services

Mandate and Responsibilities

Actively and jointly participate in the delivery of CED’s mandate by providing professional, agile, innovative and client-focused services for human, financial, administrative, information and technological resource management.

Structure

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Corporate Services Sector. The Vice-President (Guy Lepage) is responsible for the People, Culture and Workplace Branch (Strategic Partnerships – HR Corporate, Business Partnerships – HR Operations and Administration, Security and Facilities), managed by Director General Thierry Cadieux; the Information and Technology Solutions Branch (Technology Solutions and Security Directorate and Digital Solutions Directorate), managed by Director General Maxime Garon; the Departmental Finance Branch (Planning, Resource Management and Financial System Directorate, Accounting, Recovery and Control Directorate, and Procurement), managed by Director General Mathieu Paquette; the Review Unit (Quality Control and Program Evaluation), managed by Senior Analyst Maurice Turcot; and the Innovation Incubator, managed by Incubator Head Diego Dubé.
Text version:Corporate services sector structure organizational chart

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of the Corporate Services Sector. The Vice-President (Guy Lepage) is responsible for the People, Culture and Workplace Branch (Strategic Partnerships – HR Corporate, Business Partnerships – HR Operations and Administration, Security and Facilities), managed by Director General Thierry Cadieux; the Information and Technology Solutions Branch (Technology Solutions and Security Directorate and Digital Solutions Directorate), managed by Director General Maxime Garon; the Departmental Finance Branch (Planning, Resource Management and Financial System Directorate, Accounting, Recovery and Control Directorate, and Procurement), managed by Director General Mathieu Paquette; the Review Unit (Quality Control and Program Evaluation), managed by Senior Analyst Maurice Turcot; and the Innovation Incubator, managed by Incubator Head Diego Dubé.

Key Activities

People, Culture and Workplace Branch

Information and Technology Solutions Branch

Departmental Finance Branch

Review Unit

Innovation Incubator

Key Issues 2019-2020

As concerns central agencies

Specific to our organization

Legal Services

The employees in CED’s Departmental Legal Services Unit report to the Department of Justice on an organizational, functional and professional basis.

Mandate and Responsibilities

Pursuant to the Department of Justice Act, the Departmental Legal Services Unit (DLSU) is responsible for ensuring that CED’s public affairs are administered in accordance with the law, as well as generally advising CED on all matters of law it refers to the DLSU. It provides relevant legal assistance and advice regarding all CED activities.

Structure

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of Legal Services. The Department of Justice Canada supervises the Departmental Legal Services Unit to which report the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (3 advisors), the Canadian Space Agency (3 advisors) and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (3 advisors).
Text version:CED departmental legal services unit structure organizational chart

Organizational chart demonstrating the organizational structure of Legal Services. The Department of Justice Canada supervises the Departmental Legal Services Unit to which report the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (3 advisors), the Canadian Space Agency (3 advisors) and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (3 advisors).

Key Activities

Provides CED with legal advice in all its areas of activity:

Key Issues 2019-2020

Map of business offices

Map of Quebec with the territories served by the business offices.
Text version

Map of Quebec with the territories served by the business offices.

CED’s budget

Fiscal Year 2019-2020 (detailed)
(millions of dollars) Approved Budget 2019–2020
Operating expenses – salary 31.7
Operating expenses – non-salary 7.7
Grants and Contributions 278
Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program 160.7
Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) 50.8
Community Futures Program (CFP) 29.0
Steel and Aluminum Initiative 26.2
Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile 4.6
Women Entrepreneurship Strategy 3.9
Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic 1.0
Linguistic Duality 1.8
Statutory Items – Employee Benefit Plan 4.8
TOTAL (in line with the 2019-2020 Departmental Plan) 322.2
Supplementary funding and transfers, approved and/or pending approval, following publication of the 2019–2020 Departmental Plan 10.8
Infrastructure 8.0
Launch of a federal strategy on employment and tourism 4.2
5% budget carry-forward from the previous year 1.7
Women Entrepreneurship Fund (national stream) 1.7
Artificial intelligence 0.5
Mont Mégantic Observatory 0.5
Lac-Mégantic bypass 0.3
Transfer to Fisheries and Oceans -6.0
Various items -0.1
TOTAL BUDGET 333.0

Data based on the 2019–2020 Departmental Plan.

Fiscal years 2020–2021 to 2022–2023 (summary)
(millions of dollars) Approved Budget (3 years)
2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
Operating expenses (salary and non-salary) 38.8 37.4 37.4
Grants and contributions 199.9 199.9 199.7
Statutory items 4.8 4.6 4.6
SUBTOTAL (in line with 2019–2020 Departmental Plan) 243.5 241.9 241.7
Supplementary funding and transfers, approved and/or pending approval, following publication of the 2019–2020 Departmental Plan 81.5 20.7 20.8
TOTAL BUDGET 325.0 262.6 262.5

The variance between the 2020–2021 and 2021–2022 budgets is primarily due to $51.2 million in repayable contribution reimbursements. Every year, the CED contribution budget increases as a result of client repayments. Official approval of the amount of the budget increase is obtained annually.

Summary of full-time equivalents (FTEs)
Planned FTEs*
2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
342 337 333 333

* Does not take into account initiatives for which approval is pending. Data based on 2019–2020 Departmental Plan.

CED in figures

CED's Workforce

Breakdown of the CED Workforce

Approved Projects

Main Aggregate Indicators April 1, 2018, to March 31, 2019 April 1, 2019, to July 25, 2019
Number of Projects 575 438
Total Contributions ($M) 242.6 354.8
Total Project Costs ($M) 1,730.2 1,207.6
Estimated No. of Jobs Created and Maintained 5,490 3,803
Number of Communities 223 176
Number of Individual Clients 563 430
Number of Repayable Projects 349 162
Value of Repayable Projects ($M) 146.4 57.0
Number of Non-Repayable Projects 226 276
Value of Non-Repayable Projects ($M) 96.3 297.8
Annual Budget Received ($M) 249.9 277.7
Annual Budget Spent ($M) 249.9 80.6

Legal framework

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act

Context

Considerations

The Agency

The Agency’s mission is to promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate (sections 8 and 10 of the Act).

The Agency has the authority to make grants and contributions in support of programs and projects undertaken by the Agency or the Minister (section 11(1)(h) of the Act).

The Agency has the authority to make grants and contributions in support of programs including stipulating the financial conditions in contract agreements linking it to a client and that complies with Treasury Board policies.

The Agency plans, implements, directs and manages programs intended to contribute to the establishment, development, support and promotion of enterprises, as well as to the development of communities (section 11 of the Act).

It can conclude contracts, memoranda of understanding or other arrangements in the name of Her Majesty in right of Canada or in the name of the Agency, including cooperation agreements and agreements related to distinct sectors of Quebec’s economy (sections 11(1)(i) and 15 of the Act).

The Agency assists the Minister generally, in the exercise of powers assigned to the Minister under this Act and any other Act (section 12 of the Act).

The Minister

The Minister guides the policies and programs of the Government of Canada in relation to the development and diversification of the economy of the regions of Quebec (section 4 of the Act).

The Minister leads the activities of the Government of Canada in the establishment of cooperative relationships with Quebec and with business, labour and other public and private bodies in that province (sections 4, 5, 6 and 7 of  the Act).

The Minister presides over the Agency and the President (section 5(1) and 9(2) of the Act).

The President

The President is the deputy of the Minister, and is the chief executive officer of the Agency and has control and supervision over the work, officers and employees of the Agency (section 9 of the Act).

She is the deputy head of the Agency pursuant to the Public Service Employment Act (section 18(8) of the Act) and the Financial Administration Act (section 16.1 of the Financial Administration Act). This means that some of the powers and obligations are incumbent on her directly.

Reports

Every five years, a report on the Agency’s activities in applying this Act is submitted by the President to the Minister, who lays it before each House of Parliament (section 17 of the Act).

Relevant legislative tool

The complete text of the Act may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at the following address: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/E-1.3/index.html.

Acts serving as a framework for CED’s operations

Financial Administration Act

Context

One of the fundamental principles of Canadian constitutional law is that Parliament controls public money and that the State cannot spend it without Parliament's approval.

The Financial Administration Act (the Act) contains detailed provisions for the collection and expenditure of public funds. It sets out the fundamental principles involved in the organization of the State, public money, public spending, public debt, public property and public accounts. It also sets out the various remedies to be applied when government employees or third parties fail in their responsibilities.

Considerations

The Agency is a department within the meaning of the Act, as it is listed in Column I of Schedule I.1 of the Act.

The Act confers rights and obligations on the Minister. It also confers rights and obligations to the President of the Agency as deputy head.

These are the authorities and responsibilities granted to the President of the Agency and of the Minister under the Act:

Human resources management (section 12)

Internal audit (section 16.1)

Accounting Officer (section 16.4)

Debt write-off regulations (section 25)

Public disbursements (sections 31, 32, 33 and 34)

Contracts (sections 41 and 42)

Deduction and set-off (section 155)

Failure to comply with the Act (sections 80 and 81)

The Act also includes a section on offences and punishment for non-compliance. The  offences referred to in the Act include offences committed by public officers involving theft, fraud or corruption.

Relevant legislative tool

The complete text of the Act can be consulted on Justice Canada’s Web site at this address: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/f-11/

Policy on Transfer Payments

One of the Agency’s key activities is the delivery of grants and contributions to businesses or organizations for projects that will have an impact on the establishment, development, support and promotion of businesses and the development of communities in Quebec.

The various grants and contributions programs are implemented in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy Framework and, more specifically, in accordance with the Policy on Transfer Payments. Treasury Board may approve the terms and conditions for new grants and contributions programs and projects $20M and above.

Context
Considerations

Minister’s Responsibilities:

  1. following an assessment or a review of the relevance and effectiveness of Agency programs, the Minister is authorized to approve a continuation of the terms and conditions (in other words, keeping the terms and conditions as is).
  2. at the request of the Minister, on the basis of a satisfactory report on departmental performance, the Treasury Board may authorize the Minister of the Agency to approve amendments to terms and conditions. The Agency must consult with the Treasury Board before the Minister can exercise this authority.

President’s Responsibilities:

  1. Ensuring that Agency programs are and will remain relevant and effective:
    • by establishing a performance measurement strategy in the program design stage, which is maintained and updated throughout the program's life cycle.
    • by assessing the relevance and effectiveness of programs every five years and by implementing appropriate measures that take assessment results into account.
  2. Ensuring that monitoring, internal control, performance measurement and reporting systems are in place to support the management of transfer payments.
  3. Ensuring, when appropriate, the harmonization of transfer payment programs within the Agency, and ensuring collaboration with other departments.
  4. Providing the Treasury Board Secretariat, by April 1st of each year, with a three-year plan that outlines planning for new programs, continuation of old programs, amendments and cancellations, and initiatives to encourage proponents and recipients to participate. A summary plan should be made available to the public (on the Agency’s Internet site).

The complete text of the PTP and DTP may be consulted on the Treasury Board Secretariat’s website at the following addresses:

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and Creditors Arrangement Act

Context

The Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) and the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) are federal acts that set out the rules for debtors experiencing financial problems.

In the context of the Agency, some clients in financial difficulty may benefit from the protection mechanisms under the BIA and the CCAA to reduce their debt burden.

Under the BIA, insolvent debtors may declare bankruptcy or make a proposal to their creditors.

Bankruptcy is an assignment of property made to a bankruptcy trustee by an insolvent debtor. The trustee must sell property and apply the proceeds of the sale to pay off debts.

A proposal is an offer to creditors to pay a percentage of what is owed over a specific period of time, or to extend the amount of time to pay off the debt, or a combination of both. Creditors vote to accept or reject the proposal. The creditors must vote on whether to accept or reject the proposal. If the majority of creditors reject the proposal, the debtor is then bankrupt.

Once all of the terms of the proposal are met, the debtor is legally released from the debts included in the proposal.

The CCAA includes mechanisms similar to those in the BIA, but it only applies when insolvent companies have debts exceeding $5 million and want to restructure.

The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy oversees the administration of bankruptcies, proposals and arrangements under the BIA and the CCAA.

Considerations

Agency clients can decide to avail themselves of the BIA or the CCAA.

Occasionally, it may be their creditors that take action under these acts, as they may file a bankruptcy petition in court in an effort to recoup as much as possible of the amounts owed them. Under these circumstances, the Agency, as a creditor, must follow the course of the bankruptcy, proposal or arrangement.

The Agency, as an unsecured (or occasionally secured) creditor, may have a role to play in a bankruptcy, proposal or arrangement. For example, the Agency may:

In terms of debt recovery, the Collections Unit at Departmental Finances is responsible for dealing with cases that fall under the BIA and the CCAA.

Relevant legislative tools

The complete text of both Acts may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at the following addresses:

Official Languages Act

Context

The intent of the Official Languages Act (the OLA), enacted by the federal government, is to:

The Commissioner of Official Languages enforces the Act within federal institutions. He ensures that the language rights of Canadians are respected and promotes linguistic duality and bilingualism (Part IX of the OLA).

If any Canadian, including a federal public servant, whether on his/her own account or on behalf of a group or community, deems that the rights guaranteed by the Act have not been respected, he/she may file a complaint to the Commissioner (Part IX of the OLA). If a complainant is not satisfied with the results of the Commissioner’s investigation, he/she has the option, under the OLA, of recourse to the courts.

In Quebec, the Charter of the French Language makes French the official language of Quebec. This law does not apply to federal departments. It applies to most organizations funded by the Agency, including the creation of specific public posting requirements.

Considerations

The President of the Agency, as Deputy Head, is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the OLA, as well as the implementation of resulting policies;

All branches of the Agency are involved, directly or indirectly, in applying the OLA;

The business offices of Greater Montreal, Outaouais, Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Cantons-de-l'Est, Côte-Nord, Mauricie, Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Inter-regional Initiatives Directorate and Quebec—Chaudière-Appalaches must actively offer communications and provide services to the public in both official languages;

The Agency must be cautious when using this approach, as many of the organizations covered by it are subject to the obligations of the Charter of the French Language, which requires them to give precedence to French in terms of public signage.

Relevant legislative tool

The unabridged version of the OLA may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at:

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/O-3.01/FullText.html

Lobbying Act

Context

The purpose of the Lobbying Act (the Act) is to increase transparency in the lobbying of public office holders, including federal public sector employees, members of Parliament, senators and their staff. The Act is also aimed at providing accountability to sustain trust in the integrity of government decision making.

The Act applies only to lobbyists who are paid for their activities and provides for two categories of lobbyists: consultant lobbyists and in-house lobbyists. People who are lobbying on a voluntary basis are not required to register. The onus is on the lobbyist to comply with the Act.

The Act defines activities that, when carried out for compensation, are considered to be lobbying. Generally speaking, they include communicating with public office holders with respect to:

The Registry of Lobbyists is the principal means provided under the Act to ensure transparency with regard to lobbying. It is available free for online searching at www.ocl-cal.gc.ca. The Registry contains detailed information about lobbyists and their activities.

Five-year prohibition on lobbying

The Act prohibits former designated public office holders (including the Minister or Minister of State and that person’s office staff, and the Deputy Minister) and former designated members of the Prime Minister’s transition teams from lobbying during a period of five years after they cease to carry out those responsibilities.

Investigations

The Act provides for the appointment of a Commissioner of Lobbying, who is an independent Agent of Parliament with authority to enforce the Act and the Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct (Code).

Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct

The purpose of the Code is to assure the Canadian public that lobbyists are required to adhere to high ethical standards with a view to conserving and enhancing public confidence and trust in the integrity, objectivity and impartiality of government decision-making.

Considerations
Operational Aspects

From the beginning of the exchanges between the Agency and a potential client, the Agency determines whether the other person seems to qualify as a lobbyist or not. If this is the case, the Agency directs the contact to the appropriate resources at the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying.

The Agency requires a declaration from its clients that, in the event that a person acts for the client as a lobbyist, that person acts in good standing with the provisions and requirements of the Lobbying Act.

The Agency does not analyze client funding applications and does not enter into an agreement with a client that appears to be in violation of the Act. As well, it verifies the use of the clients of lobbyists throughout a project, for example through claim and help application forms.

Relevant legislative tools

The full-text versions of the Act and the Code are available on the Justice Canada’s website at: http://www.ocl-cal.gc.ca

Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act

Context

The Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (the Act) gives federal public sector employees a secure and confidential process for disclosing serious wrongdoing in the workplace, as well as protection from acts of reprisal.

It is part of the Government of Canada's ongoing commitment to promoting ethical practices in the public sector.

Considerations

Relevant legislative tool

The complete text of the Act may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at the following address:

https://lois-laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-31.9/index.html

Public Service Employment Act

Background
Considerations

Relevant legislative tool

The full-text version of the Act is available on the Justice Canada website at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-33.01/.

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

The Charter is part of the Constitution of Canada. The Charter sets forth the rights and freedoms that Canadians consider essential for maintaining a free and democratic society.

Some of the rights and freedoms contained in the Charter are:

Relevant legislative tool

The full-text version of the Act is available on the Department of Justice Canada website:

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/const/page-15.html

Access to Information Act

Context

The Access to Information Act (ATIA) has been significantly amended. Most of these changes came into effect on June 21, 2019.

The purpose of the ATIA is to enhance the accountability and transparency of federal institutions in order to promote an open and democratic society and to enable public debate on the conduct of those institutions. In this regard, Part 1 of the ATIA broadens access to federal government records by recognizing the right of the public to disclosure. Any compelling exceptions to this right must be specific and limited, and decisions on disclosure of information are subject to independent recourse. Part 2 of the ATIA sets out requirements for the proactive publication of information.

The term “record” is defined in the ATIA as: any documentary material, regardless of medium or form.

The ATIA, appoints an Office of the Information Commissioner whose mandate is to impartially examine the decisions of government entities concerning access to records. The commissioner’s role is to ensure compliance with this law. The commissioner may, in particular, authorize a government institution in writing to decline to act on an access to information request that is vexatious or made in bad faith, to make inquiries and order a government institution to disclose certain documents in whole or in part.

The ATIA stipulates that all records must be made available unless there are specific exceptions from disclosure. Sections 13 to 26 and section 69 of the ATIA set out the circumstances in which Agency may or must refuse to release a record.

For example, the Agency should not release records if:

Part 2 of the ATIA deals with the proactive disclosure of information and requires the publication of information such as travel expenses, hospitality expenses, reclassification of a staffed position, contracts over $10,000, grant or contribution agreements over $25,000 and all briefing documents (transitional workbooks) prepared for the future deputy head.

The ATIA also provides that each minister must, among other things, have the transitional workbooks, the title and reference number of each memorandum, the notes prepared for the Minister's intention for the question period, the briefing materials for parliamentary committees and information on travel and hospitality expenses.

The exemptions provided for the disclosure of information under sections 13 to 26 of Part 1 of the ATIA apply to documents that are the subject of proactive disclosure under Part 2 of the ATIA.

Considerations

Relevant legislative tool

The complete text of the ATIA may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at the following address:

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/A-1/page-1.html

Privacy Act

Context

The Privacy Act (PA) gives citizens the right to access personal information held by the government and protects that information against unauthorized use and disclosure.

Under this Act, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner has been instituted, with a mandate to examine impartially the decisions of government entities on access to records and issues of privacy protection. Its role is to ensure compliance with the Act, and in furtherance of this, they may ask the Federal Court to intervene.

Amendments were made to the PA on June 21 to, among other things, create a new exception to the definition of personal information with respect to certain information relating to ministerial adviser and ministerial staff.

General Principles
Considerations

Relevant legislative tool

The complete text of the PA may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at this address:

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-21/page-1.html#h-397182

Legal framework for the Agency’s financial activities

Obligations of the Agency with respect to National and International Trade Agreements

Context

Some international agreements are relevant to the Agency’s activities.

Main Agreements

Constitution Act, 1982, and Aboriginal consultations

Context

Section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 has the effect to give constitutional status and protection to the existing Aboriginal rights and treaty rights of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada (Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada).

The Supreme Court of Canada has described several times the duty to consult flowing from this statute.

Considerations

Duty to Consult

Operational Aspects

Relevant legislative and policy tools

There are principles governing the Government of Canada's relationship with Aboriginal peoples. This document is available on the Department of Justice Canada website at:

https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/csj-sjc/principles-principes.html

Impact Assessment Act

Context

The Impact Assessment Act (IAA) and its regulations came into force on August 28, 2019. The IAA repeals the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012.

The Impact Assessment Act provides as follows:

Part 2 of the Impact Assessment Act provides, among other things, for the creation of the Canadian Energy Regulator and repeals the National Energy Board Act. Part 3 of the Impact Assessment Act amends the Navigation Protection Act.

Considerations

Relevant legislative tool

The unabridged version of the Act may be consulted on the Department of Justice Canada’s website at:

https://lois-laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/I-2.75/page-1.html

Legislation impacting the legal relationship of the Agency and some clients

Act respecting the Ministère du Conseil exécutif (M-30)

Context

The Act respecting the Ministère du Conseil exécutif, commonly called Bill M-30, was adopted by the Government of Quebec in 1964.

Bill M-30 is a Quebec law that imposes certain prerequisites on affected organizations wishing to enter into agreements with the Government of Canada.

Essentially, any organization that receives more than 50% of its funding directly or indirectly from the Government of Quebec or the majority of the members of whose board of directors is appointed directly or indirectly by the Government of Quebec may be subject to Bill M-30. The criteria are defined in sections 3.11 and 3.12 of Bill M-30, and the organizations that meet the various criteria in the Act are then identified as a “municipal body,” “school body” or “public agency.”

Organizations that are subject to Bill M-30 cannot enter into an agreement with the Government of Canada, (a federal department or agency or a federal public body) until they have obtained the authorization of the Government of Quebec, in the form of an order in council or prior authorization depending on the circumstances of each case. These provisions of Bill M-30 came into force in 1984.

Consequently, any entity that is subject to Bill M-30 is responsible for obtaining such authorization before signing any agreement with the Government of Canada.

Considerations

Relevant legislative tool

The complete text of Bill M-30 can be consulted on the Publications du Québec Web site at this address:

http://legisquebec.gouv.qc.ca/en/ShowDoc/cs/M-30

Legal regime of cities and municipalities

Context

Through its programs, the Agency provides financial assistance to cities and municipalities.

The Municipal Code of Quebec, the Cities and Towns Act and the Municipal Powers Act include provisions used by the Quebec National Assembly to govern the powers of cities, municipalities and regional county municipalities (RCMs) in Quebec.

The contracting process conducted by cities and municipalities is also subject to certain legislative and regulatory provisions.

Considerations
The Agency's funding agreements provide that recipients, including cities and municipalities, must: “comply with all acts, regulations and orders applicable to the Client, the Project and the activities ensuing therefrom, including the Act respecting the Ministère du Conseil exécutif (chapter M-30), the Municipal Powers Act (Chapter C--47.1) . . .”.

Relevant legislative tools

The complete versions of the Municipal Code of Québec, the Cities and Towns Act and the Municipal Powers Act can be consulted at the following addresses:

4. Ministerial Services

Cabinet affairs

Support for the Minister’s participation in Cabinet committees

The Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) Cabinet Affairs Unit (CAU) supports the Minister’s participation in Cabinet committees on which he/she sits by preparing briefing notes that provide perspective on the implications of Cabinet proposals for Quebec and/or CED.

If you hold the portfolio to which CED belongs or if you are a Minister of State, CED will coordinate with the other department. If necessary, an additional message will follow.

Cabinet committees

The Minister responsible for CED sits on various Cabinet committees. The terms of reference and composition of these committees are decided upon by the Prime Minister.

The Minister receives a copy of the agenda of Cabinet committee meetings, generally along with a briefing note on each topic discussed at these meetings.

The CED CAU, with the support of the Privy Council Office, provides the Minister with electronic copies of meeting agendas and briefings (E-Cabinet).

Support for the Minister

The CED CAU reviews Cabinet committee agenda items and oversees the preparation of required briefing books. The Minister is given speaking points on both the items submitted by CED and those from other federal departments and agencies attending the meetings of the Cabinet committees on which he/she sit.

Parliamentary affairs

The Parliamentary Affairs team of the Deputy Minister/President's Office supports you in the following parliamentary activities:

Oral Questions (Question Period)

Question on the Order Paper (Written Questions)

Adjournment Proceedings

Parliamentary Committees

Ministerial communications

CED supports you in your public relations activities related to CED’s mandate. This includes announcing funding agreements, launching new programs or initiatives, participating in public events, media relations and communicating with CED employees.

CED provides advice, guidance and ongoing communications support to showcase CED’s contribution to government objectives and priorities. Communications activities enable you to highlight your urban and rural regional development objectives and mark the achievement of projects adapted to regional realities.

Announcements

You will have the opportunity to announce grants and contributions that support the main priorities of your government and that many Quebec companies and organizations receive through CED programs.

Launch of new programs or initiatives

Launches usually include an announcement. In addition to the items in the preceding section, a communications plan is developed, as are content for the CED website, key messages and a social media plan; there is also the opportunity to broadcast the event live on the Web.

MP Kits

When appropriate (for example, for a large number of similar local announcements), CED provides a kit to support MPs in their participation in public events on your behalf.

This kit usually includes:

Participation in public events

CED also supports you in your participation in public events related to CED’s mandate, whether organized by CED or its partners (speech at a convention, inauguration, informal discussions, etc.).

Media relations

In addition to coordinating media requests for its activities, CED identifies proactive media relations opportunities and potential issues. This includes providing advice and guidance, developing responses and recommending a spokesperson. CED also liaises with your office and other departments and agencies as appropriate.

Communications with CED employees

CED proposes establishing and maintaining an active link with employees located in all of its business offices through a structured offer. In addition to advice and guidance, this can take the form of personalized ministerial events or messages on special occasions (your arrival, the Holidays, National Public Service Week, etc.) or important milestones (launching new initiatives or programs, publication of the Departmental Results Report, etc.).

Social media

This factsheet is intended to help you distinguish between CED’s official social media accounts and personal or partisan accounts.

Official accounts

CED’s official accounts are used to communicate CED policies, programs, announcements and initiatives. Created and managed by public servants, these official accounts must not contain any partisan symbols, identifiers or content.

CED resources should only be used to manage, create or modify content for use on the Government of Canada’s official channels of communication (e.g., print media, social media accounts, mobile applications and websites). These resources include employees, networks and devices.

In order to avoid being perceived as supporting or endorsing a particular political party or partisan message, CED must not follow the personal or partisan social media accounts of ministers or members of Parliament, nor share their content, mention them or otherwise create hyperlinks to them.

Personal and partisan accounts

Ministers and MPs may maintain personal and/or partisan social media accounts that are distinct from Governments of Canada accounts.

Ministers may choose to use their personal or partisan social media accounts to communicate or highlight content posted on government accounts and websites, or to insert hyperlinks in their accounts that lead to government websites when such content is equally accessible to external users.

Ministers must avoid using in their personal or partisan social media accounts anything that may be confusing and imply that they are Government of Canada accounts. For example, they should avoid using their official title in the names of their accounts and should not use Government of Canada symbols, identifiers or even hyperlinks to Government of Canada websites—including pictures of officials—in their templates and personal profiles.

Ministerial Correspondence

The Corporate Secretariat in the Office of the Deputy Minister / President is responsible for handling ministerial correspondence. Ministerial correspondence refers to all letters, memos or emails addressed to the Minister or the Deputy Minister / President of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED), as well as documents prepared at their request or requiring their signature.

For you and the members of your Office, the Corporate Secretariat:

Deadlines for correspondence received that requires

Travel

Travel within Canada

Minister

Prior approval must be obtained from the Prime Minister’s Office for all travel in Canada outside the National Capital Region.

Exempt staff

Travel expenses must be authorized in advance by the Minister or his/her Chief of Staff. Expenses incurred by the Chief of Staff must be authorized by the Minister or CED’s Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Travel expense claims must be reviewed by the CFO.

Travel abroad

Minister

Prior approval must be obtained from the Prime Minister’s Office for all travel outside Canada.

The Minister’s travel is governed by the Treasury Board’s Special Travel Authorities and the Policies for Ministers’ Offices.

You must use Public Services and Procurement Canada’s (PSPC) Shared Travel Services (STS) when booking travel related to departmental business.

Your travel expenses are paid out of your office’s budget.

You will be required to certify that the expenses were incurred as part of official business.

Exempt staff

Your approval is required for international travel. Expenses must be reviewed by the CFO, both when prior approval is granted and when the claim is submitted.

Minister’s staff

Your office staff must comply with the provisions of the Treasury Board’s Special Travel Authorities and the Travel Directive. Bookings must be made through STS.

These expenses are chargeable to your operating budget.

Administrative assistant

The administrative assistant is responsible for handling travel requests and travel expense claims.

Voluntary disclosure

Ministers, parliamentary secretaries and all exempt staff are required to post, on their department’s website, all travel expenses incurred while carrying out government business on behalf of CED.

Access to Information

Context

The Access to Information and Privacy Office (AIPO) is part of the Agency’s Corporate Secretariat. Under a delegation order, the AIPO represents CED as the entity responsible for:

Access to information requests

Consultations from other federal institutions

Any federal institution that has received an access to information request may consult CED if the information is under the control of the Agency. The desired response time is indicated in the request and will usually range from five to fifteen business days.

The AIPO reviews the documents and consults the OPI and the Deputy Minister’s / President’s Chief of Staff to make recommendations on the release of the records.

Informal requests

Through proactive disclosure, CED publishes the summaries of access to information requests that have been completed each month. Anyone can then make an informal request for the records that were released.

Upon receipt of such requests, the AIPO sends a copy of the release package as well as a notice of disclosure to the OPI, the Communications Directorate, the Deputy Minister’s / President’s Chief of Staff and your office. A period of three business days is provided to raise any issues prior to the response being sent to the requester.

Monitoring of access to information requests

To keep track of access to information requests that are being processed, a report is sent to all managers, the Communications Directorate, the Deputy Minister’s / President’s Chief of Staff and your office on a weekly basis.

Documents relevant to an access request

Commonly used exemptions

Values and ethics

Under section 67.1(1) of the Access to Information Act, no person shall, with intent to deny a right of access under the Act, destroy, mutilate or alter a record; falsify a record or make a false record; conceal a record; or direct, propose, counsel or cause any person in any manner to do anything mentioned in the above.

Information technology

Information technology (IT) is an integral part of CED’s daily operations. You and your office will be given computer and electronic equipment to help you carry out your work. The Corporate Services’ IT unit will supply this equipment and provide support regarding its use and the performance of departmental activities.

Computer equipment

CED will provide you and the members of your office with a set of IT tools and electronic access controls for use during your mandate.

Electronic access includes:

Given the public nature of your duties, the acceptable use and protection of information are of paramount importance. You and your staff have responsibilities in this regard. Therefore, upon taking up your positions, you will be informed of the various risks and responsibilities associated with the use of the various technologies.

IT support

The IT team will hold information sessions for all your staff members on using and understanding the IT tools and applications.

Specific equipment for Cabinet committees

Members of Cabinet committees, including the Treasury Board, have access to additional equipment designed to ensure the security of information shared within this group. Privy Council Office staff and members of the internal departmental security teamwill inform you about this equipment and its acceptable use.

Other equipment

Some of your duties, including your work as an MP, will require the use of different equipment and networks. This physical separation is needed to ensure a strong democratic process and to separate the role of public servants from that of exempt staff.

Cybersecurity

Information theft, phishing attempts and hacking are realities that you may be confronted with as soon as you take up your mandate. An information session on cybersecurity will be given by designated CED staff members to provide you with information and tips on how to protect your information.

Relevant policy instruments and legislation

Ministerial security

Departmental security supports the delivery of reliable Government of Canada programs and services, as well as the protection of information, individuals and property.

Several stakeholders play a role in this regard:

CED’s responsibility

The deputy head, the chief security officer and other designated individuals at CED are responsible for all aspects of security. A designated person acts as a liaison officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in matters relating to the personal safety of the Minister, and provides advice and guidance on all security-related matters:

Responsibilities of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

The RCMP is responsible for the physical protection of ministers and for providing security and risk assessment consulting services as needed.

Your responsibilities and those of your office

Relevant policy and legislative instruments

Policies for Ministers' Offices

5. Government Operations

Parliamentary reporting cycle process

The Reporting team in the Office of the Deputy Minister / President coordinates the production and tabling of the following departmental reports to Parliament:

  • Departmental Plan
  • Departmental Results Report (DRR)
  • Report to Parliament

Departmental Plan

Departmental Results Report (DRR)

Report to Parliament

Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board Submissions

Cabinet and its committees constitute the forum where ministers collectively make decisions on government policy, strategies and initiatives. Ministers propose measures for study by their colleagues. When Cabinet ratifies decisions, this gives ministers the authority to implement their proposals.

  • A Memorandum to Cabinet (MC) is a document to seek a Cabinet decision on a proposed measure.

The Treasury Board (TB) is the oldest Cabinet committee of the Government of Canada and the only statutory Cabinet committee established under the Financial Administration Act.

  • A TB Submission (TB Sub) requests approval to implement a program or initiative; this document generally provides detailed information on planned expenditures and expected results.

The government decision-making process determines the need to develop and submit an MC or TB Sub, based on orientations stemming from the Speech from the Throne, elements in ministerial mandates (often triggering MCs) and the federal budget cycle (triggering TB Subs).

MCs are generally required to approve any new policy or program or to obtain additional funding, or when any policy or program is changed substantially. Management of the MC process is subject to the decision and directives of the Privy Council Office (PCO).

TB Subs provide program and spending authorities to implement new initiatives or programs or to make amendments to existing ones. Management of these submissions is subject to the decision and directives of the TB Secretariat (TBS).

CED’s role

CED leads the drafting of MCs and TB Subs concerning the Agency. CED provides support to you and your office throughout the Cabinet process—including dealing with central agencies (PCO, Finance Canada and TBS) to represent and advance your proposals. CED works closely with PCO and TBS to determine the need for an MC or TB Sub, the type of authorities required, and any necessary documents (full or slim TB Subs or MCs).

CED and with the other regional development agencies (RDAs) are also consulted on numerous MCs and TB Subs where there are regional elements at play to assess what role they could play in the delivery of these MCs or TB Subs, or to provide clarity on any potential impacts on their mandate or respective region (provincially, regionally or locally). All RDAs participate in these discussions when the initiative or program being considered is horizontal or national in scope.

CED may need an MC or TB Sub to modify the terms of its programs, to renew certain agreements (e.g. support for international organizations), or to obtain authority to implement special initiatives.

With respect to CED’s existing regular programs, TB Subs are required for any project over $20M under the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) program, and for any project over $10M under the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

Usually close to three months is needed, from the moment CED receives the signal to draft an MC or TB Sub to when they receive final approval or ratification. However, critical pathways may vary considerably depending on the urgency or complexity of the subject.

Federal government financial and reporting cycle

Timeline chart
Text version

Timeline chart

Beginning of the cycle

Planning for the fiscal year begins well before April 1, with the preparation of CED’s budgetary priorities. In its Departmental Plan, CED outlines its plans and priorities for the coming fiscal year and the two following years.

Pre-budget consultations by the Standing Committee on Finance are also held during this period. This committee may report on its pre-budget consultations for the upcoming fiscal year by mid-December, and may influence organizations’ expenditure plans.

The Budget

The Government’s efforts to reconcile its spending obligations and revenue projections are reflected in the Budget. The Budget outlines the government's fiscal, social and economic policies and priorities, while the Main Estimates set out, in detail, its projected expenditures for the upcoming fiscal year. Typically, the Budget is presented in the second half of February.

Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates

The expenditure plans are submitted to the House in their consolidated form as the “Main Estimates.” Normally, the Main Estimates are tabled in the House of Commons, and are submitted for concurrence by the House no later than June 23.

Because they are tabled so close to the Government’s annual budget, it is not always possible to include detailed budget-related plans and priorities in the Main Estimates document.

Should there be a change in the Government’s requirements as set out in the Main Estimates over the course of the year, Parliament may be asked to approve Supplementary Estimates. The Government can submit as many Supplementary Estimates as it deems necessary over the course of a fiscal year. In recent years, there have typically been two or three Supplementary Estimates per fiscal year.

CED regularly tables Supplementary Estimates to obtain funding for new programs and/or initiatives during the fiscal year.

End of the cycle – Public Accounts, the Departmental Results Report and the Auditor General’s Report

The Public Accounts of Canada and the Auditor General’s Annual Report are tabled by December 31 following the conclusion, in March, of the fiscal year to which they apply. Their review by the Standing Committee on Public Accounts completes the Government’s annual cycle of financial transactions.

Tabled in late autumn, the Departmental Results Report complements the Public Accounts of Canada by providing details about CED’s results and performance for the recently completed fiscal year.

Governor General Special Warrants

CED is entitled to Governor General Special Warrants when Parliament is dissolved due to an election. Governor General Special Warrants may be used to fund the normal operations of government, ongoing programs, contractual obligations or services to Canadians when funding is required for the public good.

Off-cycle funding request

Departments may use off-cycle funding obtained through a Memorandum to Cabinet and/or a Treasury Board Submission to implement government priorities. Off-cycle funding is an irregular mechanism used to respond to a particular context. In situations where requests for off-cycle funding are permitted, specific instructions and timelines are provided by the Treasury Board Secretariat.

Values and ethics

Under the responsibility of the People, Culture and Workplace Directorate, the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector outlines the values and expected behaviours that guide public servants in all activities related to their professional duties. The CED Code of Conduct provides context for the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector’s rules in light of the key risks inherent to CED’s mandate. These two codes are part of the conditions of employment for CED employees.

Factors of interest to the Minister and exempt staff

Relevant policies and legislative instruments

Proactive disclosure

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) is required to proactively disclose a number of documents, some of which pertain to your office. Processes are in place and the published information is available on open.gc.ca and on CED's website.

Disclosures involving Ministers’ offices directly

Transition binder and briefing materials

Travel and hospitality

Briefing notes

Question Period Notes

Other disclosures

Grants and contributions

Contracts

Access to information requests

Wrongdoing

Reclassifications

Information management

Corporate Services Information Management supports departmental activities, including those of your office, aimed at ensuring business continuity. Information is an important component of government operations.

Four types of information

Your office’s information must be separated (electronically and physically) and managed according to the type of document to which it belongs. This classification is based on the different roles you perform and allows you to meet their specific requirements.

Protection of information

In addition to their responsibilities related to the Values and Ethics Code, everyone in your office must ensure that information obtained or created is adequately protected through appropriate physical and electronic means, and by properly marking your documents.

There are three types of markings:

Designated person

To facilitate your information management obligations, it is strongly recommended that you designate a member of your team to oversee information management.

Relevant policy and legislative instruments

Acronyms

Acronyms commonly used at CED

Programs and Initiatives

REGI

Regional Economic Growth through Innovation

CEF

Canadian Experiences Fund

SAI

Steel and Aluminum Initiative

EDI

Economic Development Initiative - Official Languages

CFP

Community Futures Program

QEDP

Quebec Economic Development Program

ITB

Industrial and Technological Benefits

WES

Women Entrepreneurship Strategy

Key Federal Partners

AAFC

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

RDA

Regional Development Agencies

ACOA

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

CanNor

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

CED

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

CIRNAC

Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

DFO

Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada 

NSERC

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

CBSC

Canada Business Service Centre

DC

Destination Canada

ECCC

Environment and Climate Change Canada 

EDC

Export Development Canada 

ESDC

Employment and Social Development Canada

FIN

Finance Canada 

INFC

Infrastructure Canada 

IRCC

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

ISC

Indigenous Services Canada 

ISED

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

NRCan

Natural Resources Canada 

PCH

Canadian Heritage

PSPC

Public Services and Procurement Canada 

StatCan

Statistics Canada

TBS

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat 

TC

Transport Canada

WD

Western Economic Diversification Canada

Key Provincial Partners

IQ

Investissement Québec

MAMH

Ministère des Affaires municipales et de l’Habitation

MAPAQ

Ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation

MEI

Ministère de l’Économie et de l’Innovation

MERN

Ministère de l’Énergie et des Ressources naturelles

MFFP

Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs

MTO

Ministère du Tourisme

MTQ

Ministère des Transports du Québec

SQRC

Secrétariat du Québec aux relations canadiennes

Key Partners / Organizations

RTA

Regional tourism associations

BDC*

Business Development Centre

CCTT

College centres for the transfer of technology

CEDC

Community Economic Development Corporation

CLD

Local development centre

OECD

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

ORPEX

Regional export promotion organizations

CFDC

Community Futures Development Corporation

UMQ

Union des municipalités du Québec

Government Operations

GBA+

Gender-based analysis plus

DRF

Departmental Results Framework

MAF

Management Accountability Framework

SOR

Strategic and Operating Review

FTE

Full-time equivalent

ARLU

Annual Reference Level Update

DP

Departmental Plan

PTP

Policy on Transfer Payments

QFR

Quarterly Financial Report

DRR

Departmental Results Report

SDS

Sustainable Development Strategy

G&Cs

Grants and Contributions

MRRS

Management, Resources and Results Structures

Other Common Acronyms

GBA+

Gender-based analysis plus

DRF

Departmental Results Framework

MAF

Management Accountability Framework

SOR

Strategic and Operating Review

FTE

Full-time equivalent

ARLU

Annual Reference Level Update

DP

Departmental Plan

PTP

Policy on Transfer Payments

QFR

Quarterly Financial Report

DRR

Departmental Results Report

SDS

Sustainable Development Strategy

G&Cs

Grants and Contributions

MRRS

Management, Resources and Results Structures

* Two different organizations may have the same acronym

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